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Gen Z doesn’t think anyone can keep them safe online, and one of their biggest concerns is photos getting leaked


Over the shoulder view of young woman using smart phone while logging into an online account on laptop.Gen Z is skeptical that any entity can protect their data from cyber threats.

Oscar Wong/Getty Images

  • Gen Z has little faith that anyone can keep them safe online, according to a Dell Technologies study.
  • 18% of respondents said they trust the government to protect their data, while 17% trust private sector companies.
  • Gen Z’s main cyber threat concern relates to having their personal data or photos shared.

Gen Z doesn’t think anyone can keep them safe online.

That’s according to a Dell Technologies study released in December. The company surveyed 15,105 people between the ages of 18 and 26 years from 15 countries about how investments in technology can be used to support the economy. The findings indicate that Gen Z doesn’t trust any entity, public or private, to keep their data safe online.

The survey found that:

  • 18% of respondents said they trust government bodies, ministries, and departments to protect their data
  • 17% said they trust private sector companies
  • 25% of respondents said they trust both equally

As for Gen Z’s top cyber security concern? Having their personal data or photos shared without permission.

In addition, more than half of the surveyed individuals said they have low or neutral confidence that their personal data is being stored properly by healthcare providers.

The survey’s findings follow a spate of high-profile cyber attacks targeting major companies.

Earlier this month, hackers leaked details of over 200 million Twitter accounts onto an online forum, including email addresses and phone numbers.

In August 2021, T-Mobile announced that the personal information of 47.8 million people was stolen in a data breach. The stolen data includes customers’ first and last names, social security numbers, and driver’s license information.

Companies face serious repercussions for their failure to protect their clients: The average cost of recovering from a ransomware attack is $1.85 million, per a 2021 survey by the cybersecurity firm Sophos.

Read the original article on Business Insider