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Queerty: Of triumph, talent and representation: Our 2020 Queerty Interview Highlights


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Well, we made it. This year has almost come to an end.

Thank goodness for the entertainers, artists and activists, then, that have kept us occupied and amused this year, not to mention the folks that have worked so hard to make sure 2021 sees an end to COVID-19, Trump, social upheaval and general craziness.

With that in mind, we’d like to present some highlights from our ongoing series The Queerty Interview to share the insight and wisdom of some of the most talented and transgressive people working today. All helped make 2020 tolerable, and gave us hope that next year can be even better.

We get ‘Freaky’ with queer/nonbinary star Misha Osherovich: “I’ve come into my own”

(from left) Nyla Chones (Celeste O’Connor), Millie Kessler in The Butcher’s body (Vince Vaughn) and Josh Detmer (Misha Osherovich) in Freaky, co-written and directed by Christopher Landon.

Actor Misha Oserovich on coming out as nonbinary:

We are very lucky to work in a business that, for the most part, skews progressive by nature. That has only served me in coming out. I’ve been getting amazing scripts that have fleshed out queer characters that are complicated and messy. I’ve received nothing but appreciation meeting producers, casting directors, whomever. It makes me feel free to present as my non-binary self, and not “masc for masc Misha,” if you will. The flip to that, on a larger scale, is that for me, I grew up in an incredibly conservative family of Russian immigrants. Being masculine, straight, male dominating was very big in my family. I carried a lot of that weight on me until this year. I sat down during quarantine and said to myself Misha, you’re not just gay. You’re not just queer. You really don’t like he/him labels. I get goosebumps every time I tell this story. It was a weight off my shoulders to say the words “I’m nonbinary.” I could feel myself get lighter. I danced around my apartment naked. It was a celebration for me, and in that moment, I realized how important it is for people to be able to express their gender however they damn well please.

Queerty