mikenov on Twitter: Analyze the address of the accident, not suspect’s psyche; you will get much more of the useful information. Believe me. Experts analyze psyche of El Paso shooting suspect – KXXV News Channel 25 trumpandtrumpism.com/2019/08/05/exp…

Spread the love
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

Analyze the address of the accident, not suspect’s psyche; you will get much more of the useful information. Believe me.
Experts analyze psyche of El Paso shooting suspect – KXXV News Channel 25 trumpandtrumpism.com/2019/08/05/exp…


mikenov on Twitter


Spread the love
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
    152
    Shares
  • 151
  •  
  •  
  • 1
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

mikenov on Twitter: Are they the #FBI agents or pussy cats? “Trump – Russia Investigations” – Google News: The FBI has been criticized for not doing more to fight white nationalist violence, but some say there are some roadblocks they can’t control – INSIDER trumpandtrumpism.com/2019/08/05/fbi…

Spread the love
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

Are they the #FBI agents or pussy cats?
“Trump – Russia Investigations” – Google News: The FBI has been criticized for not doing more to fight white nationalist violence, but some say there are some roadblocks they can’t control – INSIDER trumpandtrumpism.com/2019/08/05/fbi…


mikenov on Twitter


Spread the love
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
    152
    Shares
  • 151
  •  
  •  
  • 1
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

The 7 best beefs to circle on the NFL calendar

Spread the love
  • 151
  •  
  •  
  • 1
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
    152
    Shares

Of course Jalen Ramsey and Baker Mayfield are two of the players with a score to settle in 2019.

Welcome to Revenge Week at SB Nation NFL, where we are celebrating the dish that’s best served cold. You can keep up with all our latest revenge content here.

Everyone loves a classic case of bad blood.

Football is a contentious and confrontational sport by design, but things get ramped up when two of the competitors just plain don’t like each other. You know if Michael Crabtree and Aqib Talib are playing each other, you better tune in to see the inevitable chain snatching.

That skirmish started because a player was disrespected and thought he needed to defend his pride. That’s the same dynamic that fuels so many other NFL feuds.

It’s why Jets running back Le’Veon Bell will want to show out when he plays the Steelers this season, and Ravens safety Earl Thomas will get a chance to make the Seahawks pay for not giving him an extension.

Right now, we’re not talking revenge on a former team, though. Charles McDonald already broke down the best of those matchups on the 2019 schedule. Instead, we’re focusing on the best beefs between two players — or maybe a coach and a player — this upcoming season.

Here are the battles in 2019 that have too much animosity for you to miss.

Aqib Talib vs. Michael Crabtree (Rams-Cardinals, Weeks 13 & 17)

The aforementioned chain snatching feud is back on the menu.

Arizona scooped up Crabtree in early August and that’s perfect because it puts him back in the NFC West. That means two (possibly high tension) December matchups against the Rams, and the possibility of another matchup or two with Talib.

Crabtree and Talib got along during joint practices between the Ravens and Rams last year, and they reportedly squashed their beef at a go-kart track earlier in 2019. So maybe it’s done. We’ll see if December football can ramp things back up to their old chain-snatching ways.

Richard Sherman vs. Michael Crabtree (49ers-Cardinals, Weeks 9 & 11)

Talib isn’t the only one who has had problems with Crabtree. Sherman had some harsh things to say about the receiver years ago. Back then, Sherman was a member of the Seahawks and Crabtree with with the 49ers.

The peak of the rivalry came on Jan. 19, 2014. In the NFC Championship, Sherman deflected a would-be game-winning touchdown away from Crabtree, resulting in an interception that sent the Seahawks to the Super Bowl.

Then he tore into Crabtree, calling him a “sorry receiver.”

Things never got quite that contentious between the two again. They only played each other two more times in 2014 and then Crabtree left the division to join the Oakland Raiders. They haven’t seen each other since and Sherman’s rant to Erin Andrews came to define the feud. It pushed Sherman into superstardom and Crabtree’s star has since faded.

A couple more matchups after five years away could stoke those old flames.

A.J. Green vs. Jalen Ramsey (BengalsJaguars, Week 7)

Ramsey has annoyed plenty of players in his career in Jacksonville, but nobody has blown their top quite like Green.

In a 2017 game between the Jaguars and Bengals, Green had finally had enough. After about two quarters of getting antagonized, the receiver was set off by one more push from Ramsey. Green choked, tossed, and punched the cornerback and both players were ejected.


Green was suspended for a game, and apologized for losing his cool.

But Ramsey only tried to further stoke the flames. He reportedly tried to find his way to the Bengals’ locker room after the ejections. Days later, he told reporters that Green was “soft,” “weak,” and not “mentally strong.”

Ramsey has provoked what sometimes feels like half of the league in the couple years since. The fight was out of character for Green, though. He’s generally a mild-mannered, quiet player who hasn’t had problems with anyone else.

Green’s even dismissed the idea that he and Ramsey have a problem.

“There’s no real beef,” Green told PFT Live. “There’s no real beef off the field. There’s just two competitors. Got in the heat of the moment. Stuff happens. When you’re playing, it’s sports man. You know, tempers go crazy sometimes, and sometimes you can’t control emotions. I couldn’t control mine that day. [I’ve] got to do a better job of that.”

Does that mean part two will be less contentious? Maybe. But Ramsey’s still going to be someone who talks trash constantly, and you have to imagine Green badly wants to avenge his frustrating first performance against the cornerback.

You shouldn’t expect another brawl between the two, but this midseason clash will surely have some heat.

Baker Mayfield vs. Kliff Kingsbury (BrownsCardinals, Week 15)

Most of the time a coach vs. player beef wouldn’t be that exciting to watch — not so when Mayfield is involved, though. He’s the type of player who will air his dirty laundry out in the open.

After all, the iciest death stare of the 2018 NFL season came from none other than Mayfield and was directed at his former coach, Hue Jackson.

So don’t be surprised if Mayfield has even more attitude reserved for another one of his former coaches: Kingsbury. He probably has even more reason to have a chip on his shoulder when facing Kingsbury than he did with Jackson too.

Jackson was fired by the Browns before joining the Bengals — which somehow pissed off Mayfield. In the case of Kingsbury, it was Mayfield who was spurned.

In 2013, Mayfield walked on to Kingsbury’s Texas Tech squad and earned the starting job for the opener of his true freshman season. By the end of the year, he was the Big 12 Offensive Freshman of the Year, although an injury cleared the way for Davis Webb to steal his starting role.

The situation rubbed Mayfield the wrong way and he left Texas Tech to join Oklahoma.

“When I got hurt, there was no communication between me and my coach,” Mayfield told ESPN. “When I got healthy, I didn’t know why I wasn’t playing right away. At that time, we were losing a couple games in a row. I was still clueless as to why I wasn’t playing. That was really frustrating for me because I started the first five games and we won. So, I just didn’t really know exactly what he was thinking or what the situation was.”

Between 2015 and 2017, Mayfield was a three-time All-Big 12 selection and beat Kingsbury’s Texas Tech teams three times along the way. He wound up with a Heisman Trophy, was the No. 1 pick in the 2018 NFL Draft, and enters his second season with the Browns with expectations sky high.

There’s not a lot of reason for Mayfield to harbor hard feelings, because things certainly worked out well for him post-Texas Tech. Except, this is Mayfield. He feeds off of revenge. There’s no doubt he will jump at the chance to stick it to the coach who he thinks didn’t believe in him.

Ben Roethlisberger vs. Terrell Suggs (Steelers-Cardinals vs. Week 14)

Suggs and Roethlisberger battled in the AFC North for 15 years. Now Suggs will don a different uniform for the first time in his career after joining the Cardinals on a one-year deal.

In December he’ll get another chance, likely his last, to bring down Big Ben.

Both players have experienced success in their long history of Ravens vs. Steelers matchups. Suggs has sacked Roethlisberger 17 times, more than any other player. Roethlisberger’s 13 victories in the regular season — and two more in the playoffs — against Baltimore are the most any player has ever had against the franchise.

The (presumptive) final chapter will look a lot different with Suggs wearing red. And the ill will between the two players is closer to a case of frenemies than true rivals.

“I think there’s a lot of mutual respect there between each other,” Roethlisberger said during the 2018 season. “There’s a little bit of talking on the field — I wouldn’t call it trash-talking — but there’s some mutual respect trash-talking, if you will, that goes on. It’s a special rivalry he and I have.”

Suggs hasn’t been as effusive when talking about Roethlisberger, but he was friendly enough to swap jerseys with the quarterback after their last duel of the 2018 season. Over the years, he’s called Roethlisberger a “rat bastard” with “Jedi mind tricks.” He’s also warned everybody not to fall for the quarterback’s supposed injuries.

But hatred has never really been the backbone of their grudge. Both players will be 37 for their Week 14 game, and even if it’s not quite as spicy as other feuds, it’s one we should all appreciate getting to see one last time.

Richie Incognito vs. Yannick Ngakoue (Raiders-Jaguars, Week 15)

The silly rivalry that’s brewing between the Bills and Jaguars is great fun. However, one of its most unfortunate chapters came shortly after their postseason meeting in January 2018.

After the Jaguars’ win, defensive end Ngakoue accused Bills offensive lineman Incognito of saying “some weak racist slurs” during the game. Other Buffalo linemen denied the accusation and an NFL investigation concluded it had no proof slurs were said.

A few weeks later at the Pro Bowl, Ngakoue and Incognito reportedly cleared the air.

So maybe they buried the hatchet. Or maybe the two will play with a little extra edge when the Jaguars and Raiders meet in December.

Sean Payton vs. Marcus Peters (Saints-Rams, Week 2)

The Great Gumbo Grudge started in November 2018 when the Saints picked on Rams cornerback Peters in a 45-35 win. The New Orleans offense couldn’t be stopped, but it was receiver Michael Thomas, especially, who couldn’t be contained.

Peters was in coverage for seven of Thomas’ 12 receptions and gave up 146 of the receiver’s 211 yards. That included a 72-yard touchdown for Thomas in the final minutes that put the game on ice.

Payton told reporters that Thomas burning Peters was exactly how they drew it up.

“That was the plan,” Payton said, via the Los Angeles Times. “They were going to travel Marcus to him, and that was fine by us. We thought we really liked that matchup — a lot.”

Peters responded by telling reporters he looked forward to a potential rematch:

“Tell Sean Payton keep talking that shit, we’re going to see him soon,” Peters said. “You feel me? I liked what he was saying on the sidelines too. So I’ll tell [him] ‘Keep talking that shit and I hope you see me soon. You feel me? And then we’re going to have a nice little bowl of gumbo together.”

Peters got his wish when the Rams and Saints faced off in the NFC Championship Game. In the second meeting, he gave up only two receptions for 28 yards, although the Rams floated several different cornerbacks over to cover Thomas. Still, when presented with a clear opportunity for an “I told you so,” Peters opted against it.

[infomercial voice] But wait, there’s more!

The next chapter of this particular rivalry is great because it’s not just Peters vs. Payton. It’s also the whole damn city of New Orleans vs. the Rams.

The Saints would’ve been in Super Bowl 53 if it weren’t for an atrocious missed call. Rams cornerback Nickell Robey-Coleman clearly got away with a pass interference penalty that — if called — would’ve set up the Saints to run out the clock and kick a game-winning field goal. Even the Rams admitted it should’ve been a penalty.

Instead, Los Angeles got the chance to force overtime with a field goal of its own and eventually won.

Saints fans had a big, angry parade and went so far as to file a futile lawsuit against the NFL for the result. Payton — who said the blown call was the most obvious pass interference penalty ever — led the charge for a rule change that will now let coaches challenge interference penalties.

There will be fireworks when the rematch happens in Week 2. There will also be a chance for the Saints to get some vengeance. But Payton and Peters are at the root of it all.


Spread the love
  • 151
  •  
  •  
  • 1
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
    152
    Shares
  •  
    152
    Shares
  • 151
  •  
  •  
  • 1
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

Why Do So Many Working Class Americans Feel Politics is Pointless?

Spread the love
  • 151
  •  
  •  
  • 1
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
    152
    Shares

Photo by Samantha Sophia on Unsplash

In sociologist Jennifer Silva’s first book, “Coming Up Short,” she interviewed working-class young adults in Lowell, Mass., and Richmond, Virginia.

Most had a tough time earning decent wages. Many felt like they were in a perpetual state of limbo, unable to reach the traditional markers of adulthood: job, marriage, house, and kids. But Silva was surprised to learn that many blamed themselves for their situations and believed that relying on others could only result in disappointment.

After the book was published, it bothered Silva that she never pressed her subjects further on their politics to see how they might be connected to their worldview.

Jennifer Silva.
Bucknell

Now, in a new book, “We’re Still Here: Pain and Politics in the Heart of America,” she has made working-class politics her focus.

Beginning in May 2015, Silva started conducting interviews in a once-thriving coal town in central Pennsylvania, which she calls “Coal Brook.” The timing was prescient: A month after she began her research, Donald Trump descended the escalator at Trump Tower and announced his candidacy for president.

Silva spent over a year interviewing townspeople. She gained their trust, forged relationships, and spent time in their homes and at community meetings. After years of declining prospects under both political parties, some of the townspeople she interviewed were drawn to Trump’s anti-establishment message. But for most, their politics had devolved into an abyss of cynicism that couldn’t even be penetrated by a politician who promised to “fix” everything.

In an interview, which has been edited for length and clarity, Silva describes a community that is racially diverse, hardworking and politically aware. But its residents are also deeply distrustful and shoulder immense amounts of pain and alienation.


Can you talk a little bit about what inspired you to study working-class Americans?

I was the first person in my family to graduate from college, and I experienced some self-doubt and discomfort when I tried to integrate into the world of academia.

In my position between two worlds – growing up with more working-class roots, and then building a professional middle-class life – I would cringe whenever I saw upper middle-class people treat working-class people with casual condescension or indifference. It sometimes seemed like the very colleagues who most loudly proclaimed their commitment to social justice were the ones treating the administrative assistant like their personal secretary or complaining about the cost of their housekeeper. It made me really skeptical of whether people’s stated political beliefs were even a good predictor of how they treat people with less power and status.

What was the hardest part of the research?

Getting people to open up to me. I wasn’t from the area. This is the kind of place where if you knock on someone’s door, they’re not going to let you in. I started off talking to white people. I’d go to football games and addiction meetings to try to meet people, and I was able to get to be known as “so-and-so’s friend.” Then I realized I wanted to have a non-white group in my book, because there’s been an increase in Latino and black people in the area. So I had to find out how to get this population to trust me, because the white population and the minority population don’t overlap very much.

You spent months conducting interviews. Then the election happened, and Trump won. All of a sudden, there was a lot of interest in the very sort of community you had just spent time in. What’s your take on the ensuing media coverage of these small towns?

It seemed like there was one dominant story: older white men, angry and in pain, were feeling bad about not having jobs and blaming racial minorities or foreigners.

And an element of that certainly emerged in my research. But the overall picture was just so much more complex. One of the things that was very striking to me was how much distrust there was. Among everyone I interviewed – white, Latino, and black – there was a fierce distrust and hatred of politicians, a suspicion that politicians and big business were basically working together to take away the American Dream. Everyone was very critical of inequality.

So it wasn’t this idea of “dumb white people voting for billionaires because they don’t understand it’s against their interests.” Almost everyone was aware that the system is rigged against poor people. They blamed politicians for refusing to raise wages to a level people can live on. Many wanted higher taxes to support education. I heard a lot of that, across all of the different groups, and I didn’t read a lot of that in the articles about these communities.

You interviewed 108 people and only 37 of them actually voted, with 26 voting for Trump. Of the 41 black or Latino people you spoke with, only four voted. So to me, one of the major stories wasn’t necessarily support for Trump. It was a refusal to participate in politics altogether.

Two-thirds of the sample were nonvoters. They knew the election was happening but they just viewed political participation as pointless. They thought of it as a joke. And they said, “Look at what’s happened in my lifetime, it doesn’t really matter who’s been president.”

One of the critiques I heard a lot was that everything’s about money now. If you have money, your life is good. You can buy anything. But if you don’t have money, the system is stacked against you. I heard that from old white men. I heard that from young black women. And it was interesting, because it’s not untrue, right? If you kill someone and you’re rich you’re more likely to get off.

So I think for them it was almost like, “Well, if we participate, we’re just playing along and pretending. But we’re not naive. We know already that politicians are bought off by corporations. No one actually cares about us.”

There’s that great story in the book where you showed up to an interview wearing your “I voted” sticker.

He laughed at me! Like, “Why would you vote? Are you crazy?”

And yet of those who voted, Trump did emerge as the clear favorite.

Well, Trump and Bernie Sanders. But Sanders wasn’t an option in the end. The general take on Trump was, “We like Trump’s personality, we like his aggressiveness, we like how he doesn’t care about the rules.” And then they liked Bernie Sanders for his authenticity and his heart. But for many who even ended up voting for Trump, they still didn’t think it would matter if they voted.

Where does this disillusionment come from?

There’s a sense of betrayal by a number of social institutions – education, the workplace, the military – all of these things that they thought they could trust, but, for one reason or another, ended up disappointing them.

So they turned inward. No one was really looking for external collective strategies changing the world. Many wanted to simply prove that they didn’t have to rely on other people. There was this sense that any kind of redemption is only going to come out of your own efforts. And then you’ll see some blame other people who don’t seem to support themselves.

Before and after the 2016 election, J.D. Vance, with the publication of his memoir, “Hillbilly Elegy,” was held up in the mainstream media as an oracle for dispossessed rural Americans. But in your book, you vehemently disagree with his worldview.

Vance seemed to look at other people in his community and think that the reason they were suffering was because of their own choices – that they weren’t really strong enough to face the truth about themselves, that they had to stop blaming the government and corporations and actually take responsibility.

And that just wasn’t the story that I heard. I heard a lot of self-blame and a lot of people who wanted to take responsibility for their own fate. There was a lot of soul searching and a lot of pain. Vance makes it seem like everyone just needs to be like him – a lone hero who escapes his difficult past on his own. It’s not that simple or easy.

Can the pain people feel be used as a bridge to bring people together? That’s how I end my book. And I saw signs of it. Families suffering from addiction were coming together and wondering, how can we change the ways that doctors prescribe medicine? Or how can we challenge pharmaceutical companies to stop making these medications that get our children addicted? Can we get the police to stop arresting addicts instead of helping them?

That sounds like the stirrings of political mobilization. But what’s the biggest obstacle that’s preventing working class voters from organizing en masse?

I think that it’s the absence of what you could call “mediating institutions.” The people in my book have a lot of critical and smart ideas. But they don’t have a lot of ways to actually connect their individual voices. So they don’t have a church group or a club that they would join that would then give them political tools or a louder voice. And I don’t even know if they would join one if these did exist, because of their distrust of institutions. So it just ends up being turned inward rather than outward.

Within academia, what are some of the most common misconceptions you encounter when it comes to working-class politics?

I have heard some liberal academics talk about how self-defeating and misinformed working-class white people are. They seem to believe that if these people just knew the facts, they would change their votes immediately. Or they dismiss all working-class white people as angry and racist.

The working-class people I met were often radically critical of inequality and deeply skeptical about whether we live in a meritocracy. It was important to me to show that the people in my book of all races are creative and thoughtful – that they arrive at their positions by piecing together their histories and experiences in meaningful ways.

Sometimes these ways are destructive and divisive, and sometimes they have the potential to be transformative and healing.

[ You’re smart and curious about the world. So are The Conversation’s authors and editors. You can read us daily by subscribing to our newsletter. ]

Nick Lehr, Arts + Culture Editor, The Conversation

This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

The post Why Do So Many Working Class Americans Feel Politics is Pointless? appeared first on Towleroad Gay News.


Spread the love
  • 151
  •  
  •  
  • 1
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
    152
    Shares
  •  
    152
    Shares
  • 151
  •  
  •  
  • 1
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

Newscasters Across the Country Can’t Believe It’s Already August: WATCH

Spread the love
  • 151
  •  
  •  
  • 1
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
    152
    Shares

Newscasters all across the country can’t believe it’s already August, and Jimmy Kimmel has taken note..

The post Newscasters Across the Country Can’t Believe It’s Already August: WATCH appeared first on Towleroad Gay News.


Spread the love
  • 151
  •  
  •  
  • 1
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
    152
    Shares
  •  
    152
    Shares
  • 151
  •  
  •  
  • 1
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

Starting pitching will keep the Red Sox home this October

Spread the love
  • 151
  •  
  •  
  • 1
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
    152
    Shares

MLB: Game One-Boston Red Sox at New York Yankees

Andy Marlin-USA TODAY Sports

From Chris Sale on down, Boston’s rotation has been a liability in 2019.

Chris Sale stormed off the mound Saturday at Yankee Stadium, ejected and dejected after another disappointing start that has come to define the Red Sox’s season. An eight-game losing streak has torpedoed Boston’s postseason chances, thanks to a starting rotation that was once a strength but is now a liability.

The starting pitching has been atrocious during the Red Sox’s recent eight-game losing streak, having given up a 10.70 ERA and 13 home runs over that spell. Underperformance has been a season-long trend: Sale, David Price, Rick Porcello, and Eduardo Rodriguez have all posted higher ERAs this year than last, with all but Price holding higher FIPs as well.

Boston’s rotation ERA was in the upper third of baseball when they won the World Series in 2018, but this year it’s nearly in the bottom third.

The Red Sox were so reliant on their rotation in 2018 that all five starters were used in relief at least once during the postseason. Sale closed out the final inning of the World Series. Their starting quintet had a 3.44 ERA during the playoff run, including a 1.13 ERA by Nathan Eovaldi in the Fall Classic, where he was used exclusively in relief.

This year Eovaldi is in the pen again, serving as the closer after a long stint on the injured list. Lately he hasn’t had many leads to protect.

Red Sox starting pitchers have allowed five or more runs 30 times this season, tied for fifth-most in the majors. Boston is 8-22 in those games. They had 26 such games all of last season.

The leading culprit is Sale, whose 4.68 ERA is by far the worst of his career. He had a 2.11 ERA last year. Sale has been one of baseball’s best starters for nearly a decade, finishing in the top six in Cy Young voting in each of the previous seven years.

That streak won’t continue this year.

Playoff hopes for the Red Sox are on life support, who are now 6½ games out of the second wild card spot in the American League, and need to pass two teams to play in October. Boston has a 15.8 percent shot to make the postseason, per FanGraphs. That number was 64.6 percent before this eight-game losing streak.

At 14½ games back in the AL East, Boston’s bid for a fourth straight divisional crown is dead. The wild card hopes are nearly there, too. Thanks to an unreliable starting rotation, the Red Sox will be watching the postseason on television this year.


Spread the love
  • 151
  •  
  •  
  • 1
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
    152
    Shares
  •  
    152
    Shares
  • 151
  •  
  •  
  • 1
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

Subscribe to the world’s finest college football newsletter

Spread the love
  • 151
  •  
  •  
  • 1
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
    152
    Shares

The Read Option is relaunching at Banner Society, your new home for college football internet.

Here is a way to sign up (though clicking on this link and filling out the very short form there seems to be a little easier for most people):

This newsletter will publish between two and five times each week — five times per week until Banner Society’s launch on Aug. 21, and then roughly three times each week during the college football season (and then maybe a little less frequently during the offseason). We’ll see what kind of frequencies people like best!

It’ll have some weekend reaction stuff during the season, weekly schedule watch guides, posts that are a bit more immediate than the articles we’ll put on our site, other stuff, and a lot of the kind of recruiting content we’d been sending to Bud Elliott’s Crootletter. Folks, that’s right, two college football newsletters for the non-price of one.

What’s Banner Society, you might ask? That’s explained over here. Basically, it’s this company’s new home for national college football coverage, building on what SBNation.com accomplished in that space over the last decade or so. It’ll be at Banner Society dot com, once we’re actually finished creating such a thing. It doesn’t replace SB Nation’s many college team sites and will hopefully become your go-to for college football stories, discussion, podcasts, and so forth — including newsletters! Oh right, subscribe to the newsletter!


Spread the love
  • 151
  •  
  •  
  • 1
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
    152
    Shares
  •  
    152
    Shares
  • 151
  •  
  •  
  • 1
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

Transgender Woman Murdered in South Florida

Spread the love
  • 151
  •  
  •  
  • 1
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
    152
    Shares

“Kiki” Fantroy, a transgender woman, was murdered in Southwest Miami-Dade County late last week, on a street corner near an abandoned home. She is the 13th documented homicide of a transgender woman this year.

The Miami Herald reports: ‘The victim’s mother had speculated publicly the past two days that her daughter was targeted because of her gender identity. But a law enforcement source familiar with the crime said Friday that police were “making progress” in the investigation and that they don’t believe Fantroy’s gender identity played any part in her death. …Miami-Dade Police Detective Lee Cowart said Fantroy was shot several times and that there was a group of people nearby when the shooting happened. Police haven’t said if the shooter was on foot or approached in a vehicle. ‘

The post Transgender Woman Murdered in South Florida appeared first on Towleroad Gay News.


Spread the love
  • 151
  •  
  •  
  • 1
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
    152
    Shares
  •  
    152
    Shares
  • 151
  •  
  •  
  • 1
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

Thousands are sharing this video of a cop at Pride. See why.

Spread the love
  • 151
  •  
  •  
  • 1
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
    152
    Shares

A viral video featuring a dancing UK cop at the Brighton Pride celebration has made a viral celebrity of the funky fuzz.

The clip shows an officer wearing a Pride lai and showing off his moves to the Steps song “Scared of the Dark.” As of this writing, it had been viewed well over 25,000 times.

The cop’s wild abandon in his dance also earned him supportive notice from the internet. “This officer is amazing. Loud, proud and dancing. @PrideBrighton @HertsPoliceLGBT Love to see him at Manchester Pride in a few weeks,” said Twitter user Graham Mitchell. “Love this, 50 years after Stonewall, the police are not fighting us, they are dancing with us,” said Radhe Shyam, echoing a similar sentiment.

Kylie Minogue headlined Brighton Pride this year, crooning out gay anthem after gay anthem. Former Spice Girl Mel C also took to the stage to perform the Spice Girls’ song “2 Become 1,” which she dedicated to the transgender and non-binary communities.

Spread the love
  • 151
  •  
  •  
  • 1
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
    152
    Shares
  •  
    152
    Shares
  • 151
  •  
  •  
  • 1
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

North Carolina Governor Roy Cooper Signs Executive Order Targeting Gay Conversion Therapy

Spread the love
  • 151
  •  
  •  
  • 1
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
    152
    Shares

North Carolina Governor Roy Cooper has signed an executive order barring state funds from going to doctors and organizations that practice gay conversion therapy.

Tweeted Cooper on Friday: “Conversion therapy has been shown to pose serious health risks, and we should be protecting all of our children, including those who identify as LGBTQ, instead of subjecting them to a dangerous practice. Today, Gov. Cooper signed Executive Order No. 97 to help protect LGBTQ children in North Carolina from the harmful practice of conversion therapy.”

“It wasn’t immediately clear Friday whether any state money goes toward funding the practice,” The Herald Sun reported. “Cooper’s order instructs the N.C. Department of Health and Human Services to make sure it’s not sending any state or federal funds to people or organizations that use conversion therapy.:

Said Kendra R. Johnson, executive director of the LGBT advocacy group Equality NC, in a press release: “No child should be told that they must change their sexual orientation or gender identity. We’re grateful that Gov. Cooper agrees. We are committed to ending this debunked practice and will work for statewide protections.”

The post North Carolina Governor Roy Cooper Signs Executive Order Targeting Gay Conversion Therapy appeared first on Towleroad Gay News.


Spread the love
  • 151
  •  
  •  
  • 1
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
    152
    Shares
  •  
    152
    Shares
  • 151
  •  
  •  
  • 1
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •