Bol Bol has star potential. This is a perfect gamble for TEAMNAME

Spread the love
  • 151
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
    151
    Shares

Why Bol Bol could be the 2019 NBA Draft’s star hiding in plain sight. A whole round and then some elapsed until the Nuggets took a chance on him.

Bol Bol’s combination of elite size, length, and shooting touch makes him a choice with tantalizing upside by the Denver Nuggets with the 44th pick in the 2019 NBA Draft (via the Miami Heat). At the same time, questions over his mobility, health, and frame threaten to derail his sky-high potential before it ever comes to fruition. Now, Nuggets must hope Bol a future star hiding in plain sight instead of a draft bust waiting to happen.

Bol is the son of Manute Bol, the former NBA legend who became a beloved figure during his 10-year career as a 7’6 center who twice led the league in blocked shots. Bol was 10 years old when his father died, but he carries his legacy in his stark physical resemble and evolutionary skill set that feels grounded in the foundation of his father’s talent.

Bol chose to play for Oregon as a consensus top-five recruit in the class of 2019, but he never got to show the full breadth of his ability. A non-displaced fracture of the navicular bone in his left foot ended Bol’s season after just nine games, a small sample, yet one which showed everything that went into making him the biggest boom-or-bust prospect in this draft.

It’s possible Bol’s lack of power and athletic fluidity means he gets run off the floor in a league that’s downsizing faster than ever. There’s an equal chance his incredible shot-making and shot-blocking ability at 7’2 with a 7’7 wingspan helps him develop into a unique weapon for Denver that few teams could match up with.

Was the risk worth the reward? While there’s a valid argument to be made against Bol, this is the case that Denver was right to gamble on his talent.

Bol might have been the best pure shooter in the draft

Bol isn’t just an elite shooter for a 7’2 center. Over his final season of high school ball and his truncated college career, Bol made a case to be one of the best and most versatile shooters in the draft, regardless of position. Here are his shooing numbers on the EYBL and at Oregon.

Don’t question Bol’s range, either: he made an incredible 13-of-19 attempts from NBA three-point distance at Oregon, per The Stepien. He was exceptional as a spot-up shooter, averaging 1.61 points per possessions to finish in the 99th percentile of the country, per Synergy Sports.

Here are seven of Bol’s three-pointers at Oregon that show his potential as a shooter:

Bol doesn’t have the quickest or highest release, but given time, he’s a deadly shooter off the catch. He’s going to be devastating in the pick-and-pop game, especially when playing with someone who attracts attention like Jamal Murray.

He’s also going to give the Nuggets immense gravity simply by standing at the three-point line. Defenders can’t sag off him, whether he’s in the corner or the top of the arc. He’ll be a threat in transition as a trailing shooter, too.

The only real question with Bol’s shot is how often he can get it off. Bol only attempted 2.8 threes per game at Oregon, a number he’ll have to at least double to reach his peak value for the Nuggets. His low and slow release will make high volume a challenge, but being 7’2 gives him an inherent advantage shooting over any switch defender. As long as he cans his open shots, he’s going to bring sizable value just with the threat of his shot.

The first step to Denver unlocking Bol’s pro potential is encouraging him to let it fly.

Bol’s length will be an asset for the Nuggets as NBA defenses continue to evolve, especially in a zone

Big men in today’s NBA defenses are often asked to switch screens on the perimeter and defend guards. How will Bol survive given his obvious lack of lateral quickness and agility?

While Bol may not project as a switchable big, it’s important to remember NBA defenses are always evolving. Bol is currently 19 years old. How will NBA teams defend when he’s 24? What will defensive schemes look like when he’s 27?

These playoffs have proven switch-everything is far from the only defensive concept that works. The Toronto Raptors stifled the Golden State Warriors in crunch-time of Game 2 of the NBA Finals by playing a straight box-and-one around Stephen Curry. Toronto also used a zone heavily against the Bucks in the Eastern Conference Finals. Zone defense became an emerging trend throughout the league this year, with the Nets, Heat, Spurs, and Celtics among those who used it most successfully.

A zone is one example of a defense Bol could thrive in. He still has some promise on that end, starting with his tremendous length. His 7’7 wingspan and 9’7 standing reach is a game-changer contesting shots around the basket and closing out on shooters. He already showed refined timing as a shot blocker, posting a 12.4 percent block rate at Oregon that would have been top-10 in the country if he played enough games. He also did well to avoid foul trouble, averaging only 2.2 fouls per 40 minutes. His shot blocking and foul avoidance was also backed up in his high school stats, when he blocked 3.9 shots per game on Nike’s EYBL circuit while only fouling 1.4 times per game, per D1Circuit.

Bol’s strength and quickness issues are real, but his length and anticipation as a shot blocker means he should be able to contribute some level of value as a defender for the Nuggets. Those are traits defenses will always covet even as coverages evolve. Bol might not be a perfect fit in the switch-everything defensive schemes of today, but a smart coach like Michael Malone should still find a way to maximize his rare gifts.

Bol adds some versatility on offense

While three-point shooting is going to be the foundation of Bol’s game offensively, he’s not strictly a catch-and-shoot guy. Bol’s shooting touch also extends to his work in the post and on floaters around the rim.

Bol scored 1.04 points per possession on post touches this year, per Synergy Sports, which ranked in the 87th percentile nationally. It’s likely he’ll struggle to score efficiently in the post against the NBA’s biggest defenders, but it will be a weapon against smaller defenders on switches.

Bol also has some potential as a ball handler, especially for a guy who is 7’2. He’s comfortable putting the ball on the floor and knows when to attack a closeout instead of firing the three. He’s starting to develop a floater, which only makes him more dangerous off the bounce.

Here is a cut of Bol scoring off the dribble or on post moves.

On the season, Bol scored 1.15 points per possession, which ranked in the 96th percentile of the country. He was a remarkably efficient scorer.

The NBA has never really seen someone like Bol Bol

Bol’s size and length puts him in elite company. The only players to measure with a 9’7 standing reach at the draft combine since 2000 and play meaningful NBA minutes are Rudy Gobert and Mohamed Bamba. Even if you bump Bol’s 7’7 wingspan down to 7’6, his only additional comps are Andre Drummond, Hassan Whiteside, DeAndre Jordan, JaVale McGee, Ike Anigbogu, and Thomas Bryant.

Look at all of those names above. It isn’t just that Bol Bol has the most shooting potential of anyone in that group at 19 years old. It’s he’s already the best shooter by a mile. No one else with his rare length is even in his zip code as a three-point threat.

Of course, Bol is also the lightest of that group by a significant margin. He weighed in at only 208 pounds at the combine, which is alarming. Even Bamba was 225 pounds. With high hips and skinny legs, Bol’s featherweight frame is an issue. While “motor” has been called Bol’s biggest problem area for much of his life as a prospect, the real issue is his inability to generate power because he lacks strength badly right now and doesn’t even have the frame to theoretically support it.

Regardless, Bol’s stock was curiously low entering draft season and the Nuggets took advantage by selecting him far later than he should have gone. He’s a superior prospect to Bamba by most analytical measures, yet no mainstream draft evaluators saw them in the same tier, as you can see in the table below with each player’s ranking from reputable outlets.

The big difference is Bamba was polished off the court, was known as a good teammate, and sold himself well. In addition to Bol’s physical limitations, his character has been questioned by many evaluators.

Still, the impossible combination of knockdown shooting and length from Bol is hard to resist. It would be a miracle if Bamba — who went No. 6 overall last year — ever develops into as good as of a shooter as Bol is right now, and Bol is already comparable or superior in most other on-court metrics. Neither player would be as valued in a league that wanted to pound the ball to its centers in the post, but those days are long gone. Today’s coaches should be happy giving Bol the green light from three and then enjoy all the gravity benefits that come with it.

It was always going to take a leap of faith for any team to select Bol, but if fortune favors the bold, the Nuggets will one day be handsomely rewarded. In a draft light on star power after Zion Williamson, Bol was worth the risk down at 44 overall.


Spread the love
  • 151
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
    151
    Shares
  •  
    151
    Shares
  • 151
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

Brandon Clarke could be the NBA Draft’s secret superstar

Spread the love
  • 151
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
    151
    Shares

Clarke was the best college basketball player you’ve never heard of at Gonzaga. Grizzlies fans should be thrilled.

Brandon Clarke waited more than 600 days to make his debut at Gonzaga, but it only took him two weeks to introduce himself as one of the most impactful players in college basketball.

When Gonzaga faced Duke in the title game of the Maui Invitational, it was built as a potential national championship preview in November. It came with only one sizable asterisk: without injured star Killian Tillie, the ‘Zags felt like they were taking the court without their best player.

Clarke used Tillie’s absence as an opportunity to prove himself against the most talented team in the country. He hasn’t looked back since.

When Zion Williamson plowed through teammate Rui Hachimura, Clarke was there with a weak side swat. When R.J. Barrett beat his man off the dribble, Clarke darted over to send it away. When Tre Jones had him beat on the perimeter, Clarke came from behind with the block. When Williamson grabbed an offensive rebound, Clarke rejected his putback.

And when Barrett attempted to tie the game on the final possession, Clarke was again there to deny him at the rim and seal an 89-87 Gonzaga victory.

The dream of Duke’s undefeated season had been dashed and the mythology surrounding Williamson had been hit with a reality check, at least for one night. It happened largely because a transfer from San Jose State was the best player on the court, not by being the biggest or the most skilled player on his own roster but by simply being better at the things that aide winning.

That’s what makes him such a steal for the Memphis Grizzlies with the No. 21 pick in the 2019 NBA Draft. Clarke may not have the measurable or the high upside of a younger prospect, but he just knows how to play and win.

Even hardcore college basketball fans might not have been familiar with Clarke before that night, but it became impossible to ignore him afterwards. While Williamson’s dominance exists in a plain above anyone else, Clarke has spent his season at Gonzaga putting together a rock solid statistical argument that he’s the next best player in the country.

Clarke still isn’t a household name as he prepares to enter the NBA. Just know he’s the biggest reason Gonzaga was on the top line in the first place.


There are a countless number of Williamson mixtapes from his prep days that have views in the millions. There appears to be only one high school mixtape for Clarke, and it doesn’t even have 5,000 views.

Clarke was a late bloomer in every sense, growing five inches in his last two years of high school. Though he took his school to the state title game in Arizona as a senior, he was still decidedly below the radar. San Jose State was his only scholarship offer.

His impact was immediately clear at SJSU. As a freshman, Clarke was named Sixth Man of the Year in the Mountain West. As a sophomore, he was named first-team all-conference by leading the Spartans in scoring, rebounds, assists, and blocks. There was only one problem: San Jose State was terrible, going 23-38 in Clarke’s two years on campus. Granted, those were the program’s best seasons in a long time.

When head coach Dave Wojcik was left amid allegations of discrimination, Clarke looked into his options as a transfer. He would pick Gonzaga over Oregon and Washington State.

North Dakota State v Gonzaga
Photo by William Mancebo/Getty Images

Gonzaga is known for its success developing international players, but the program is every bit as good with transfers. Behind every great Mark Few team has been a breakout transfer, from Kyle Wiltjer to Nigel Williams-Goss to Jordan Matthews and Johnathan Williams. None of this was lost on Clarke, and it stayed on his mind while he waited from March of 2017 to Nov. of 2018 to finally take the court in a college basketball game again.

Clarke chose the ‘Zags for their track record of development as much as their winning culture. He entered the program with one main objective from that perspective: rebuilding his jump shot.

“He initiated the change before he and I even started working on it,” assistant coach Brian Michaelson told The Athletic before the season. “It wasn’t just a tweak here or there. It was an overhaul. That is a drastic thing to be willing to change. I don’t think I’ve seen someone here overhaul something so extreme.”

Refining his jump shot remains Clarke’s biggest area for improvement before he begins his pro career, but he’s already made major strides since coming to Spokane. After going only 2-for-9 from three-point range in his two seasons at SJSU, he’s 4-for-15 from three this season. He’s also improved his free-throw percentage from 57 percent to 69.4 percent.

From his balance to his released point to his general mechanics, Clarke’s jumper looks so much better now than when he arrived on campus. If it continues to progress, the Grizzlies will have an even bigger steal on their hands.


Despite what coaches described as a “fundamentally flawed” jumper upon joining the Bulldogs, Clarke still had a tremendous foundation of skills as a player. He showed off incredible reaction time and play recognition on the defensive end. He was able to stay locked in at all times mentally. He had a spin move already in his back pocket on offense, and showed touch on his floaters.

More than anything, Clarke is an exceptional athlete. Take it from teammate Josh Perkins:

“Brandon is a freak athlete, but he understands his spots, his angles, he can pass, he can shoot and he’s fast.”

“He jumps faster and higher than any human being I’ve been around.”

Here’s Clarke in his own words:

“I know that I can kiss the rim,” Clarke said. “If you want to do the math, I’m 6’8, the rim is 10 feet, so you can probably figure out my max vertical.”

Clarke has channeled these gifts into immense production at Gonzaga. Clarke didn’t just have a case to be one of the best players in college basketball this season. He put together an argument that he was one of the most effective players in the college game over the last decade.

Box score plus-minus is perhaps the best all-in-one stat college basketball has for determining a player’s total impact on the floor. You can read a full explanation of it here. Essentially, it estimates the number of points contributed by a player vs. an average player, per 100 possessions.

There were only two players who posted a higher BPM than Clarke since the 2010-2011 season: Zion Williamson and Anthony Davis.

Per 40 minutes, Clarke averaged 24.1 points, 12.2 rebounds, 4.5 blocks, 2.7 assists and 1.7 steals per game. He did it while shooting 70.5 percent on two-point field goals. Take those numbers per 100 possessions, and no one has ever equaled them since sports-reference started its database.

Clarke is plastered all over the leaderboard for college basketball’s advanced metrics. A small sampling:

  • He was second in the country in PER behind Williamson at 37.4
  • He was second in the country in effective field goal percentage behind Williamson at 69.3 percent.
  • He’s was first in the country in offensive rating and third in defensive rating.
  • He was fourth in the country in win shares and second in win shares per 40.

Clarke did it by being the most dominant defensive player in the country while also being one of the most efficient offensively. His statistical merit can speak for itself, but it doesn’t tell the full story. Why focus solely on the numbers when Clarke did stuff like this?


Despite Clarke’s dominance, he wasn’t even widely considered the best player on his own team. When the Naismith Award released its 10 semifinalists, Rui Hachimura made the list but Clarke did not.

Hachimura received more attention in part because of his backstory coming over from Japan, and in part because he’s put up bigger scoring numbers off the strength of his mid-range shooting touch. But if you kept a close eye on the ‘Zags this season, there’s no question who their best player was. It’s Clarke, whose quick-twitch athleticism, unbreakable focus, and intuitive instincts fortified Gonzaga as a truly elite team.

Clarke was way off NBA radars at the start of the season. Now, he’s a first-round pick, despite turning 23 years old before what would be his rookie season.

Keep overlooking Brandon Clarke at your own peril. Just know that, Zion Williamson aside, there wasn’t a better player in college basketball this season.


Spread the love
  • 151
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
    151
    Shares
  •  
    151
    Shares
  • 151
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

Who is the real Cam Reddish? Hawks fans now get to find out

Spread the love
  • 151
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
    151
    Shares

The 10th pick to Atlanta is the enigma everyone is trying to figure out in the 2019 NBA Draft.

CHICAGO — Cam Reddish thought you have him all wrong.

As he faced reporters at the NBA Draft combine, the line of questioning directed at Reddish was unusually probing. Reddish was asked to respond to questions over how much he loves basketball. He was asked if he felt he was overshadowed at Duke by playing alongside Zion Williamson and R.J. Barrett. He was asked if his laid back personality is a cause for concern.

“I can do it all,” Reddish said in a voice that is soft-spoken but defiant. “I feel like I’m capable of doing everything on both sides of the floor. I’m excited for the opportunity to do that.”

A year ago, Reddish was ranked ahead of Williamson by most recruiting services and was considered by some to have the highest long-term upside of anyone in Duke’s prized incoming freshmen class. After one rocky season in Durham, Reddish spent draft season fighting to save his reputation as much as his stock.

Now, he’ll continue that fight with the Atlanta Hawks after they selected them with the No. 10 in the 2019 NBA Draft.

[Do you like draft grades? We have 2019 NBA Draft grades just for you!]

Reddish looks like the prototypical NBA prospect from the moment he walks into the gym. He measured at 6’8 with a nearly 7’1 wingspan at the combine, ideal size for a wing who can defend multiple positions and still create his own offense. Add in a smooth shooting stroke, the ability to pull-up off the dribble, and point guard experience from his high school days, and Reddish offers an intoxicating package of new-age potential that feels like a seamless match for today’s NBA.

So why didn’t Reddish’s obvious talent translate into production at Duke? That’s the question Atlanta must ask themselves after a freshman year full of statistical red flags. Reddish’s effective field goal percentage of 46 percent is the lowest for any projected first rounder. He badly struggled to score inside the arc, shooting an abysmal 39 percent on two-pointers. His turnover rate was twice as high as his assist rate.

It all went in to making Reddish the NBA Draft’s biggest enigma, a player who looked the part of a top-five pick, but had little hard evidence to back it up and thus slipped to No. 10. It made him a landmine in a draft that was starved for star potential after Williamson. Pass on him for a less talented player, as the Wizards did, and look like a fool if he plays up to his ability. Take him, like the Hawks did, and look like a sucker if he never overcomes the same deficiencies that made him so inefficient in college.

Who is Cam Reddish? It’s a mystery no one has been able to crack just yet.

Duke v Louisville
Photo by Andy Lyons/Getty Images

Seth Berger remembers the moment he knew a young Cameron Reddish was different. It harkens back to his early high school days when the Westtown head coach saw his burgeoning talent show up at the gym by himself to get work in at 5:45 a.m. before the school day started. Berger gushes as he says Reddish was never late for a practice his entire senior year.

Westtown is the northwest Philadelphia school where Reddish blossomed into a blue chip prospect. It’s also the place where he began to hone his ball handling and passing ability after Berger made the decision to play him at point guard.

“Any basketball player’s highest level is the one where they’re making the most difficult decisions that they can,” Berger said. “Moving him on the ball early was an effort to increase the speed of the improvement of his decision making.”

It was Berger’s job to maximize Reddish’s natural tools by helping him learn to process the game more quickly. What he found was a player willing to learn, who was blessed with a naturally unselfish attitude, and who treated teammates with a kindness and equality that belied his five-star status.

Reddish burnished his reputation at USA Basketball and on Nike’s EYBL grassroots circuit. This isn’t an example of a late bloomer — Reddish has been ranked at or near the top of his class from the moment it started being evaluated. He could have played for any college in the country, but chose Duke as he started his senior year of high school, hoping to follow in a burgeoning lineage of star wing scorers like Jabari Parker, Brandon Ingram, and Jayson Tatum. He had no idea at the time Barrett and Williamson would be joining him.

Reddish had a foundation for success with his physicality and his personality. Converting that into efficiency has always been a work in progress. He finished his final season of grassroots (or AAU) basketball as one of the leading scorers on the EYBL at nearly 24 points per game, but he only shot 40 percent from field and 29.7 percent from three, per D1 Circuit. He also struggled at the Nike Hoop Summit, finishing 2-for-8 from the field for seven points, as scouts began to question his motor, focus, and shot selection.

Reddish’s one year at Duke hardly provided any answers. He scored in single digits in 13 of his 36 games. He shot only 35 percent from the field. He ranked in the 38th percentile in points-per-possession in transition and in the 36th percentile in points-per-possession in the half court, per Synergy-Sports. Often times, it felt like Reddish was pressing when he finally got his turn with the ball in an offense that monopolized by Barrett and Williamson.

Reddish’s supporters say he didn’t get the opportunity to show the full breadth of his talent at Duke playing alongside two top-three draft picks. His skeptics wonder why he couldn’t make a more meaningful impact as opposing defenses game-planned to stop his teammates first. Berger sees it a different way.

“I don’t view success by statistics,” Berger says. “I look at his season and say he did what his team needed him to do to be really successful. Whatever the coach asks him to do is what he’s going to do. That’s the type of person and player Cam is.”

Army v Duke
Photo by Streeter Lecka/Getty Images

While Reddish’s lone college season was characterized by inconsistency and inefficiency, there were some some encouraging statistical markers. He posted an impressive steal rate of 2.9 percent, which historically is a strong predictor of success from college to the NBA. His free throw percentage of 77.2 percent shows he has tremendous potential as a shooter even if he ran hot-and-cold at Duke from behind the arc. He also thrived as a pick-and-roll ball handler, finishing in the 96th percentile nationally for points-per-possession. He graded out as “very good” in pull-up shooting and “good” in isolations.

“I don’t necessarily see myself as just a shooter,” Reddish says at the combine, hoping he doesn’t get pigeonholed as a catch-and-shoot wing. He wants to show what he can do with the ball in his hands.

A core muscle injury prevented Reddish from winning himself some new fans in private workouts — a video from before the injury went viral, as Reddish exploded for a dunk and sank five consecutive three-pointers. Of course, Reddish has always been a great NBA prospect on-paper. It’s molding that theoretical talent into tangible production that has eluded coaches and scouts for so long.

As a high school player, Reddish drew comparisons to Paul George and Tracy McGrady because of his frame and athletic fluidity. Even after a rough year at Duke, the narrative as he entered this draft was that he may have the highest upside of any player available after Williamson.

But instead of seeing Reddish’s combination of length and that shooting stroke as an avenue for a high ceiling, perhaps it’s what gives him a high floor. The NBA will always need long, versatile players who can shoot. That’s what Reddish should be able to provide to the Hawks as he continues to develop, even if he doesn’t turn into a Hall of Famer. What some see as a lack of “killer instinct” also makes him a great teammate with an amiable personality who has always been highly coachable.

Reddish didn’t live up to his high school hype during his one-and-done season, but he still has all the attributes for a long pro career. Instead of focusing on why he isn’t standing out, maybe it’s time to consider how he can fit in.


Spread the love
  • 151
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
    151
    Shares
  •  
    151
    Shares
  • 151
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

New Bulls point guard Coby White is built for buckets

Spread the love
  • 151
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
    151
    Shares

How the North Carolina guard unlocked his potential in the 2019 NBA Draft by learning to fly.

Rob Salter is used to people doing a double-take when they walk into his office and see the photo hanging on the wall. It’s hard to recognize a young Coby White, about to enter his freshman year at Greenfield School in Wilson, North Carolina in this picture, with a shaved head. It might be the last picture of White before he started to grow out his signature big, floppy hair.

Salter had already helped build a successful program as the head coach at Greenfield when White became a varsity starter as a freshman. It didn’t take Salter long to learn his new guard was special. Greenfield faced Wesleyan Christian Academy and Harry Giles early in the season, a player widely considered the best long-term prospect in the country at the time. White ended the game with 25 points.

“Coby can score in his sleep, man,” Salter told SB Nation.

That’s what the Bulls expect, too, after they made White the No. 7 pick in the 2019 NBA Draft. White has been getting buckets his entire basketball career, so why stop now? With Zach LaVine, Otto Porter and Lauri Markkanen as running mates, White should put up points in bunches.

White earned most of his buckets in those early days by simply out-running everyone else on the court. When he showed up for his sophomore season in high school after a four-inch growth spurt over the summer, his athleticism kicked into another gear. His teammates quickly learned they’d have to keep up with a point guard who had a tireless dedication to pushing the ball in the open floor and an incredible knack for putting it in the basket.

White didn’t stop scoring at Greenfield until he broke the North Carolina state record for total points in a career. It happened at a tournament in Virginia, when the hosting school stopped the game unbeknownst to anyone at Greenfield to recognize White’s achievement. He left the school with 3,511 points in his career, a fringe five-star rating as a recruit, and a rare opening to be a freshman starter at North Carolina for Roy Williams.

[Do you like NBA Draft grades? We have 2019 NBA Draft grades for you]

North Carolina has always been a program built on speed going to back to the heyday of Dean Smith. With Coby White as their engine, UNC played at its fastest pace since KenPom started tracking those numbers in the 2001-02 season. To watch the Tar Heels was to see White burning opposing defenses down the court on the secondary break, curly afro blowing in the wind and pink shoes looking like a blur out of Sonic the Hedgehog.

After a breakout season where he broke Michael Jordan’s freshman scoring record and powered the Tar Heels to a No. 1 seed in the NCAA tournament, White’s college career ended sooner than he or his school ever anticipated. White entered the NBA draft, and he’s now a top-7 pick.

“It still hasn’t hit me yet,” White said at the NBA draft combine. “You dream it before you realize you’re capable of it. ”

Everything in White’s life is moving fast right now. Fortunately for Chicago fans, that’s always when he’s been at his best.


White is a nominal point guard, but he hardly plays like a floor general in a traditional sense. At nearly 6’5, White combines the scoring mentality of an off-guard with an unbreakable resolve to put pressure on the defense with the ball in his hands. In that sense, White’s offensive skill set is a natural fit for how the position has evolved in today’s game.

White has an advanced scoring package for a lead guard. His favorite move is the step-back, an increasingly essential weapon to combat defenses built to smother ball handlers at the three-point line. When White creates space, he has a fluid shooting stroke and quick release he can get off at any time.

North Carolina rarely ran sets, but when they did, White proved he was comfortable navigating ball screens. He’s particularly adept at splitting defenders to get into the paint. He loves the behind-the-back dribble either in the half-court or transition, often going for ambitious dribble moves even when they started leading to turnovers. Williams is notorious for giving freshmen a short lease, but he rarely tried to rein his point guard in. It speaks volumes about how essential White’s scoring and tempo were to the Tar Heels.

White remains more of a scorer than a facilitator, but he’s far from selfish. He showed promise as a decision-maker in the half-cout, whether that meant finishing plays himself or hitting a teammate for an assist. He finished in the 81st percentile for points plus assists per possession against a set defense, per Synergy Sports, which is impressive efficiency for a player who has mostly staked his reputation in the open floor.

Part of the reason White proved to be so effective in the half court is because he’s a truly lethal shooter off the catch. He finished in the 92nd percentile on spot-up opportunities, showing a strong feel for moving without the ball to go along with great balance and a quick, repeatable shooting motion. He’s going to have gravity off-the-ball as a shooter for the Bulls, which makes him an ideal fit when Zach LaVine or Otto Porter initiate the offense.

White holds his own when stacked up against guards with similar size who also got drafted in the lottery in recent years. It serves to create a baseline comparison for what the Bulls hope to get out of him early in his career.

While his turnover rate is higher than anyone else on the list, keep in mind that White led what was by far the fastest offense of the group. The Tar Heels finished No. 6 in KenPom’s tempo rankings this year, with only low-major programs in front of them. Only McCollum led an offense that finished in the top-60 in the tempo rankings, and that was in the low-major Patriot League, which potentially contributed to his steal rate as well. No one else on this list played for a team that finished in the top-130 of pace.

“The league is full of great point guards every night,” White said at the combine. “I’m looking forward to the challenge of testing myself.”


White was on his way to the airport to fly out to Nike Elite Camp in Los Angeles during his rising senior year when he got a phone call that would change his life. His father had passed from liver cancer. Donald White — affectionately called ‘Doc’ — rarely missed one of Coby’s games and became a fixture around Greenfield. The pink shoes White wore at North Carolina were a symbolic nod to those affected by cancer.

“Basketball was his escape route,” Salter said.

Salter remembers when White heard about a fifth grader at Greenfield, a K-12 school, who had just lost his mother to cancer. White sought out the child on his own and shared his experience with him. “That’s the type of young man Coby is,” Salter said.

White acknowledged the last two years have felt like a blur. Few expected him to be a one-and-done, let alone a lottery pick after his freshman year. He is far from a finished product, though his inefficiencies feel more like room for growth than a handicap.

White only finished in the 27th percentile on pull-up shooting attempts at UNC, but his shooting mechanics and balance are reason to believe it should become a strength of his game. He was also better as a playmaker than most anticipated after burnishing his reputation as a scorer in high school, though he clearly needs to get better at making reads to be a full-time lead initiator for the Bulls.

If White continues to improve his facilitating and starts to see his pull-ups drop more frequently, he projects as a guard who can play on- or off-the-ball that provides incredible straight-line speed, shifty ball handling, and knockdown shooting. Look at the lineups the Houston Rockets were playing in the Western Conference semifinals against the Golden State Warriors, often closing with James Harden, Chris Paul, Eric Gordon, Austin Rivers, and P.J. Tucker. No one in that lineup was bigger than 6’6. It feels like a brand of basketball White is particularly suited to play.

With incredible straight-line speed with the ball in his hands and the ability to hit shots from all over the floor, White is a natural fit for today’s game. His Chicago teammates just better be in good enough shape to run with him. Coby White isn’t slowing down any time soon.


Spread the love
  • 151
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
    151
    Shares
  •  
    151
    Shares
  • 151
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

Timberwolves’ Jarrett Culver is the NBA Draft’s most versatile prospect after Zion Williamson

Spread the love
  • 151
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
    151
    Shares

Inside the rapid improvement that made Culver the 6th pick in the 2019 NBA Draft.

Jarrett Culver’s competitive spirit was forged through the timeless tradition of sibling rivalry beneath the unforgiving west Texas sun. As the youngest of three boys in a family full of athletes, Culver honed the talent that made him the No. 6 pick to the Minnesota Timberwolves in the 2019 NBA Draft by facing his older brothers on the courts and fields around their Lubbock home.

The Culvers didn’t just play one sport — they played all of them. Oldest brother Trey beame a two-time NCAA high jump champion who is training for the 2020 Olympics. Middle brother J.J. currently plays college basketball at the NAIA level. Jarrett first excelled as a running back and wide receiver on the football field. His soccer ability was the stuff of urban legend. But upon enrolling at Coronado High School, he decided basketball was the sport he would devote himself to in full.

Randy Dean coached all three Culver boys on Coronado’s basketball program. He described Trey as a glue guy who provided defense and rebounding. J.J. “only knew one speed” which led to spectacular moments but also some mistakes. And Jarrett?

“He just had that presence on the floor that the great players have,” Dean told SB Nation. “He wasn’t flamboyant or cocky about it. But you knew he was the guy.”

The youngest Culver flourished in his junior year as Dean moved him from the wing to full-time point guard. He was turning into the best player in the area by the time Coronado went to a Christmas tournament when misfortune struck. Culver went up for a ferocious dunk, got caught up on the rim, and came down with an injured shoulder. The pain lingered through the season but he never took any time off.

When Coronado was eliminated from the playoffs, the school soccer coach asked Jarrett and J.J. if they’d be interested in joining his team for the end of the season. Jarrett scored four goals in six games to help the squad qualify for the postseason. Then it was back to basketball for his debut appearance on Nike’s EYBL circuit.

Culver had only been receiving mid-major college interest to that point. Everything change when he was asked to join Texas-based program Pro Skills for their trip to Brooklyn on the opening weekend of EYBL play. In his second game, Culver scored 18 straight points, drawing legitimate headlines and opening up the flood gates for his college interest.

Two days before Culver would fly to New York, Texas Tech hired Chris Beard away from UNLV in one of the strangest and most impactful coaching carrousel fiascos in the history of the sport. While former Red Raiders coach Tubby Smith never extended an offer to Culver, Beard did so immediately. Culver committed before the start of his senior year, choosing to stay in his hometown for college. He was still considered a three-star prospect at No. 312 in 247 Sports’ rankings.

Finally, Culver saw a doctor about his shoulder. They told him he had a torn labrum and advised getting surgery immediately. Culver couldn’t stand the thought of missing his senior year, so he opted to play the entire season injured and have the procedure when the year ended.

“That’s really the story of his character right there,” Dean said. “The other guys on the team were guys he had been playing with since seventh or eighth grade. He wanted that senior year to be good for them not just for himself. That’s why he chose to play”

[Do you like NBA Draft grades? We have 2019 NBA Draft grades]

NCAA Basketball: Final Four-Semifinals-Michigan State vs Texas Tech
Brace Hemmelgarn-USA TODAY Sports

Texas Tech had never been past the Sweet 16 in the history of the program when Culver arrived on campus. As a freshman, he emerged as the third leading scorer on a team that would go all the way to the Elite Eight. Still, Culver wasn’t even the breakout recruit on his own team. That would be Zhaire Smith, another three-star prospect who blossomed into the surprise No. 16 NBA Draft pick last year after a brilliant one-and-done season no one expected.

That gave Culver the blueprint to follow his own NBA dreams. As the Red Raiders lost six of their top eight leading scorers from the year before, Culver assumed the mantle as Beard’s leading man. Like high school, he was moved on the ball from the wing. And like high school, he thrived with the move to de facto point guard.

All Culver did as a sophomore was take a team full of overlooked recruits just like himself to the national championship game. He was the hub of everything the Red Raiders did on offense, turning into a dynamic off-the-dribble creator on a team where no one else could easily get their own look. Here are seven plays that show the versatility of his scoring ability out of pick-and-rolls and isolations:

Culver always has a counter. With hesitation dribbles, spin moves, and wrong-footed layups, he turned into a crafty driver and one of the sport’s great finishers. On the season, he converted 69 percent of his shots at the rim with only 25 percent of those field goals coming off assists, per Hoop-Math. While a player like R.J. Barrett drew criticism for having tunnel vision and seemingly predetermining his drives, Culver consistently had a trick up his sleeve to get a bucket.

Culver was the driving force on the Red Raiders’ offense, but the real reason the team ran all the way to the national championship game was because it had the most efficient defense of college basketball’s modern era. It’s defense where Culver will likely make his biggest impact early in his career for the Timberwolves. He projects as a three or potentially four-position defender who can switch screens, hold his own at the point of attack, and help teammates by making quick reads away from the ball.

His advanced feel for the game shows up on both ends, giving him tremendous role player potential as he makes the jump to the NBA. Even if he never develops into a go-to offensive option in the league like he was at Texas Tech, his defensive ability, passing skill, and high IQ all project to make him a valuable player for Minnesota. Here are three defensive plays and three passes that show Culver’s two-way versatility.

Culver was widely considered of the best perimeter defenders in this draft. Critics will point to his 30 percent three-point percentage as a reason for TImberwolves fans to worry about his offense, but it’s also worth noting he scored efficiently in a variety of different ways. Culver graded out as “good” or better in every play type this season in Synergy Sports’ database.

The jumper will get better, too. Culver reworked his shot over the last offseason to create a higher release and improve his rotation on the ball. The fact the Culver was able to get off 5.2 three-point attempts per-40 is encouraging. Volume is a skill in itself, something that contemporaries like De’Andre Hunter (3.4 three-point attempts, per 40) couldn’t match even as a more accurate shooter.


Versatility is the name of the game in today’s NBA. Jarrett Culver is as versatile as any player in the 2019 NBA Draft this side of Zion Williamson.

Culver can initiate offensive sets as a ball handler and find a way to score efficiently regardless of the situation. While he lacks ideal first step burst, he makes up for it with a full bag of counters and an unusual rhythm to his attacks. He also knows how the make smart cuts off the ball and even has a solid post game when a smaller defender switches on him on.

Defensively, Culver has the size, quickness, and feel to be impactful. He measured at 6’6.75, 194 pounds with a 6’9.5 wingspan at the combine, giving him the type of frame to handle a plethora of different offensive players as he adds muscle to his frame. He thrives in help-and-recover situations, which is a vital part of defense in today’s NBA.

Players typically get drafted in the top six for takeover scoring ability, blistering first-step athleticism, or knockdown shooting. Culver doesn’t have any of those traits, at least not yet. What he does have is a well-rounded, intelligent game that translates at both ends. He had a massive impact on winning at the college level and projects to do the same for the Timberwolves.

Whatever Minnesota needs, Culver is there to do it. His game isn’t done blooming yet.


Spread the love
  • 151
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
    151
    Shares
  •  
    151
    Shares
  • 151
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

De’Andre Hunter’s evolution into a top-five pick is the best kind of success story

Spread the love
  • 151
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
    151
    Shares

Hunter is ready for his next step in Atlanta after winning a national championship.

Tony Bennett saw his most talented player get down on himself midway through Virginia’s Final Four game against Auburn. De’Andre Hunter was struggling, coming off three straight subpar performances in the NCAA tournament by his own lofty standards as UVA entered Minneapolis. Now he was going cold again in the biggest game of his life, missing a three that would have tied the score at the end of the first half as the ‘Hoos fought for a spot in the national title.

Bennett delivered a simple message in the locker room.

“Be free, man. Go after this. We need you. Be a player.”

From the moment he arrived on campus as a long-but-skinny recruit to the day he was picked No. 4 overall by the Atlanta Hawks in the 2019 NBA Draft, positive reinforcement has been a key for Hunter. Bennett knew a string of missed shots would get in Hunter’s head. A string of mediocre games was even worse, especially when the stakes were this high.

From that point on, Hunter showed why the Hawks traded multiple picks in this year’s draft, a future first-rounder next year, and agreed to take on a bad contract to move up and get him with the No. 4 pick, ahead of Jarrett Culver and Cam Reddish.

On the first possession of the second half against Auburn, Hunter streaked to the basket for a dunk. He splashed a jumper a minute later. He finished an offensive rebound for a putback, and then hit a layup. Virginia had unlocked Hunter, and with it, their chances at a national championship.

The ‘Hoos would survive on another miracle finish, setting the stage for a showdown between two eventual high draft picks in the final game of the season. Hunter’s assignment was Culver, one of the few players in the country with the size and skill to match him. Hunter was named Defensive Player of the Year just a few days earlier, and this would be his biggest test yet.

All he did was turn in the performance of his life to finish with 27 points.

Hunter was money from three-point range, canning 4-of-5 attempts from behind the arc, including the biggest shot of the game, to the tie the score with 15 seconds left. He crashed the glass all night to finish with nine rebounds. He also consistently found his way to the foul line to give his team easy points when every possession felt like a war.

Best of all, Hunter blanketed Culver, holding him to 5-of-22 shooting that included forcing multiple stops in the final seconds with the game on the line. Culver was a master at finishing at the rim, but Hunter forced misses by giving him no room to breathe when he did drive. More often, Culver couldn’t even get to the rim, instead settling for tough jumpers. When Texas Tech forced a switch, Hunter stymied the other Red Raiders scorers, too.

This is the game Hawks fans will remember, since Hunter and Culver will forever be linked. You wonder if it’s a moment that tipped the scales for Hawks general manager Travis Schlenk, given that he could have picked either one upon trading up for the No. 4 pick.

Three years at Virginia did so much for Hunter. It helped him grow into the best point-of-attack defender in college basketball. It made him something close to a knockdown shooter. It also put a national championship ring on his finger.

Now, it’s turned him into the No. 4 pick for the Hawks. It’s been an incredible rise for a player Bennett kept on the sidelines his entire first year on campus with a redshirt.

“In this game and this setting, and he saved his best for last,” Bennett said of Hunter in the glow of his championship press conference. “That tells you there’s something in that young man. He’s got more — he’s scratching the surface.”

NCAA Men’s Final Four - National Championship - Texas Tech v Virginia
Photo by Tom Pennington/Getty Images

There’s an alternate universe where Hunter never arrived at Virginia.

Bennett had four scholarships when he was putting together the 2016 recruiting class that would change Virginia basketball forever. One went to Kyle Guy. Another went to Ty Jerome. A commitment from center Jay Huff followed. UVA only had a spot for Hunter because their biggest recruit decommitted.

Sacha Killeya-Jones was a five-star recruit and McDonald’s All-American. He committed to Virginia early before seeing his stock blow up on the grassroots circuit the next spring and summer. Killeya-Jones decommitted from UVA in June of 2015. Hunter accepted Virginia’s scholarship offer three months later.

Killeya-Jones would choose Kentucky, where he’d get lost in a loaded front court as a freshman and ultimately chose to transfer. He picked NC State, where he lasted only a few months before leaving the program in February.

Losing one of the highest-rated prospects in program history in Killeya-Jones felt like a huge blow to Virginia at the time. Ultimately, it was one of the best things to ever happen to them.


Hunter felt betrayed the day Bennett told him he was going to redshirt. Hunter was the lowest-rated member of Virginia’s incoming class, but he was still a consensus top-100 prospect out of Philadelphia. Recruits of that caliber typically don’t redshirt, but Bennett had a plan in mind.

The first issue was one of available minutes. Virginia had Marial Shayok, Devon Hall, and Isaiah Wilkins all set for heavy playing time at the three and the four. Bennett also thought Hunter needed to gain strength after showing up on campus at only 195 pounds. Virginia put him on a strict diet and weight lighting program, led by strength and conditioning coach Mike Curtis.

Patience eventually paid off. Hunter showed flashes in the non-conference season the next year, then hit his stride in ACC play. By the end of the year, Hunter was named Sixth Man of the Year in the conference and there were whispers he could be a fringe first rounder if he entered the draft. Virginia was rolling, going from unranked in the preseason to the No. 1 overall seed entering the NCAA tournament at 32-2 overall.

That’s when disaster struck: Hunter broke his wrist in the Cavaliers’ conference tournament title game win, which sidelined him for the big dance. You already know this story ends with the biggest upset in college basketball history.

With his wrist on the mend and his team in need of redemption, Hunter announced he was returning to school without even testing the draft waters. Virginia now belonged to the 2016 recruiting class, with Hunter, Guy, and Jerome forming arguably the best perimeter trio in the country.

Hunter wasn’t sneaking up on anyone this season. He was circled as one of the best players in the country and a potential lottery pick on every preseason scouting report. That type of focus from the opposition and the pressure that comes with multi-million dollar hype could have cracked a lesser player. Instead, Hunter kept getting better.

NCAA Men’s Final Four - National Championship - Texas Tech v Virginia
Photo by Streeter Lecka/Getty Images

All Hunter did this season was turn into college basketball’s most terrifying man defender while also being ruthlessly efficient in every offensive opportunity he got. Now weighing 225 pounds while standing 6’7 with a wingspan of at least 7’1, Hunter had the strength to match his skill. It all coalesced to turn him into one of the best players in the country.

Hunter is the ideal man defender. He has the length and quickness to potentially guard four positions at the next level, but it’s his balance and technique that makes him special. Hunter is a master at getting over screens, at using his feet to deny driving lanes, and at closing out on any shot from the perimeter. There aren’t many players in the world who have a prayer against the NBA’s biggest, baddest wing scorers, but Hunter’s physicality, focus, and defensive fundamentals gives him a chance.

Offensively, Hunter was efficient without operating at a high volume. He hit nearly 44 percent of his threes, took smaller defenders in the post, and even showed some capability playing both sides of the pick-and-roll in limited opportunities. His statistical breakdown paints the picture of a complete player:


Synergy Sports

Hunter fits the prototype of the 3-and-D wing NBA teams covet. His story tracks similarly to Mikal Bridges, another long wing who redshirted when he entered college, blossomed into a national champion at Villanova, and then became a lottery pick.

Scouts worry Hunter’s man defense won’t translate to a modern NBA that places more emphasis on helping and recovering. For all of his defensive ability, Hunter’s block and steal rates were still curiously low. He’ll also have to quicken the release on his three-point shot, and prove he can beat a closeout by creating off the dribble. But those concerns weren’t enough to stop the Hawks from trading a pile of draft picks to nab him at No. 4.

Hunter is the best kind of college basketball success story, the player who had to grind for three years before enjoying the ultimate breakthrough both for his team and individually. At 21 years old, he already looks like a finished product, though those close to him like Bennett swear he’s still just scratching the surface.

Hunter has already accomplished so much as he enters the draft. If this really is just the start, Hawks fans will feel very lucky they get to enjoy a productive, two-way wing for the next decade.


Spread the love
  • 151
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
    151
    Shares
  •  
    151
    Shares
  • 151
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

The 5 best fits of the 2019 NBA Draft

Spread the love
  • 151
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
    151
    Shares

We may have just found the next P.J. Tucker

Welcome to the 2019 NBA Draft Fit Watch, where we scout our newest basketball children to find the next P.J. Tucker of the style world.

This class came out with risky fits that mostly paid off. Zion Williamson started the night strong in an all-white suit and those who followed him stepped up.

This draft class had a common theme: No Ties. And it worked! Here were the best fits of the night.

[Do you like NBA Draft grades? We’ve got live NBA Draft grades right here!]

1. Bol Bol

I won’t lie. I absolutely and unequivocally cannot emphasize enough how much I love Bol Bol’s fit. Dude came out wearing a spider web. A SPIDER WEB.

Legend status on night one.

2019 NBA Draft
Photo by Sarah Stier/Getty Images

2. Darius Garland

Listen, Bol Bol wore a spider web, so he won. But Darius Garland came in with heat. Sheesh.

3. Ja Morant

Ja went with purple on top of purple, and even better, the inside of his suit is stitched with family photos.

4. R.J. Barrett

Purple on top of black with the pocket square. Yeppp. And the inside pockets have Canadian flags.

2019 NBA Draft
Photo by Sarah Stier/Getty Images

5. Zion Williamson

An all-white fit on the best player in the draft fit perfectly around his ridiculous large arms. This was a No. 1 draft pick’s suit and it looked dope on Zion.

2019 NBA Draft
Photo by Sarah Stier/Getty Images


Spread the love
  • 151
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
    151
    Shares
  •  
    151
    Shares
  • 151
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

The Rays splitting time between Tampa and Montreal is absurd, but fun to think about

Spread the love
  • 151
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
    151
    Shares

The idea was dead almost before it even started

The idea of a professional sports team calling two cities home at one time isn’t new, and it is thrilling only in its potential for chaos. The Rays, currently the Tampa Bay Rays, are the team at the center of the latest multi-city quest, with Jeff Passan of ESPN reporting that Montreal is being explored as a shared option for the franchise:

Under the plan, the Rays would play in new stadiums in both the Tampa Bay area and Montreal, according to sources. The ability to play games early in the season in Florida would preclude the need for a domed stadium, cutting the cost of a new building.

But even though the exploration of such a move was approved by MLB, there is the matter of dealing with the city of St. Petersburg, who doesn’t sound like a willing participant in such shenanigans.

Even though the idea is essentially dead, it doesn’t mean we can’t come up with a name.

The X-Rays is cool. Just think of the cool, potentially glow-in-the-dark uniform designs that could produce.

I’m partial to the Snowbirds, the nickname given to folks who flee the cold winter months to warmer climates.

Maybe the Exorcists. The Rays already got rid of their original Devil Rays name, so this fits. And Montreal would get to heal from the demons who took baseball away from them in 2004.

What about the Pucks? As a nod to a great hockey city like Tampa, that has won a Stanley Cup more recently than Montreal.

The Royal Tarpons could be a combination homage to longtime minor league traditions in each city. Jackie Robinson, among many others, played for the Montreal Royals, while Johnny Bench and Pete Rose, for example, played for the Tampa Tarpons.

Why the Rays need to move

Tropicana Field is a bad stadium and are second-worst in MLB in attendance, averaging 14,546 fans per game. The only reason Tampa isn’t dead last is because the other Florida baseball team — the Miami Marlinshas treated its fan base like a punching bag for years and wonder why nobody shows up to their still-shiny seven-year-old stadium.

The Rays tried for a new stadium of their own, going so far as to share renderings of a new park in Ybor City, about a half hour away from Tropicana Field, which is located in St. Petersburg, last July.

Financing never got past the planning stages, and at the 2018 winter meetings Rays owner Stu Sternberg announced those stadium plans, originally set to open in 2023, were scrapped, leaving the Rays at Tropicana Field for the foreseeable future. Their lease at the stadium runs out in 2027.

Sternberg on Thursday confirmed his team’s dalliance with Montreal, saying, “My priority remains the same, I am committed to keeping baseball in Tampa Bay for generations to come. I believe this concept is worthy of serious exploration.”

Because nothing says “commitment” by working with another city to host at least some of your team’s games. That’s all this really is, pitting two cities against one another to see who ultimately wins out. The city that’s poutine its money where its mouth is will ultimately get the team, who is just looking to Rays revenue. That’s how this always goes.

This isn’t new

Montreal has been through this two-city thing before. MLB bought the Expos and had them split their time between Montreal and San Juan, Puerto Rico, playing 43 of 161 home games (26.7%) at Hiram Bithorn Stadium in 2003-04. The team averaged only 11,026 fans over those two years, dead last in MLB, before the franchise was relocated to Washington D.C. for the 2005 season and renamed the Nationals.

The Hornets shared New Orleans with Oklahoma City for two seasons from 2005-07, gauging the latter for NBA feasibility. New Orleans got to keep its team, but there was still a victim city. There always is. Seattle got kicked on the crotch this time, getting to briefly glimpse Kevin Durant before the Sonics moved to OKC in 2009 and became the Thunder.

Tampa Bay is bound to be the eventual victim in the Rays situation. Every attempt at a new stadium has fallen through, so why on Earth would they agree to build a new stadium, only to share it with another city?

Montreal’s motivation is much clearer. They were a major league city for 36 seasons, and had their best season (1994) wiped out by a strike that canceled the World Series. They’ve had no baseball for a decade and a half, and are desperate for anything they can get.

There are far too many problems with a two-city team, but that doesn’t mean we can’t root for chaos. What would fan interest be like in cities that are only half committed to by the team? Just imagine the logistical nightmares for players, needing to find homes in two different cities.

Do the Rays split holidays too, splitting Thanksgiving weekend to Tampa Bay on Thursday and Montreal on Friday?

Such a move wouldn’t happen right away anyway. After all, those new stadiums still need to be built, if they even are at all. Luckily the owners meetings are this week in New York, so commissioner Rob Manfred was ready with a comment on Thursday.

As much as it might be cool and strange to see a nomad team split time with two cities, don’t bet on that happening. This is a bidding war, and the city that financially entices the Rays the most will be the one that receives its services. No half measures here.


Spread the love
  • 151
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
    151
    Shares
  •  
    151
    Shares
  • 151
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

PHOTOS: Highlights from the Queerty Pride50 extravaganza

Spread the love
  • 151
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
    151
    Shares

John Cameron Mitchell accepts the Queerty Pride50 Catalyst Award

World Pride in New York City is still officially a week away, but the rainbow momentum is palpable.

Queerty kicked things off on Wednesday with a dazzling evening at Town Stages in SoHo to celebrate this year’s Pride50 honorees and to recognize 50 years of remarkable advancements in LGBTQ culture since Stonewall.

The looks were on point, naturally, but the real spirit of the room was focused on 50 trailblazing individuals who actively ensure society remains moving towards equality, acceptance and dignity for all queer people.

With an appearance from this year’s Catalyst Award recipient John Cameron Mitchell, an arresting performance by Pride50 honoree Jeremiah Lloyd Harmon, and many celebrated activists and entertainers in attendance, the night was one to remember and hold on to.

Queerty managing editor Dan Tracer played host in collaborative couture designed by Project Runway season 16 winner Kentaro Kameyama and Simay Bleur that was certainly somewhere over the rainbow; we’re still not exactly sure where.

The event partnered with SAGE, a vital organization providing assisted living for LGBTQ seniors. Several SAGE participants were in attendance to enjoy the festivities, and all were grateful for their presence. And you’d better believe they worked that red carpet.

Special thanks to Pride50 sponsors Target, Amtrak, Visit Seattle, Svedka, and Nulo.

Here are some highlights from the engagement (for even more photos, head here):

Pride50 honoree Nakhane, Pride50 Catalyst Award recipient John Cameron Mitchell
Pride50 honoree/performer Jeremiah Lloyd Harmon and SAGE participant Guy Aiossa
Pride50 honoree Darnell L. Moore and SAGE volunteer Lujira Cooper
Queerty’s Dan Tracer
Pride50 honoree Monica Helms, SAGE participant Renee Imperato
Pride50 honoree Adam Eli, SAGE Bronx participants and partners Donna Sue Johnson & Marie Spivey
SAGE participant and outspoken activist Ellen Ensig-Brodsky, Pride50 honoree Morris Singletary
Pride50 honoree Vlada Knowlton
Pride50 honoree Andrew Gurza
John Cameron Mitchell, SAGE participant and NYC drag staple Ruby Rims
Q.Digital CEO Scott Gatz, Paige Turner, actor Matt W. Cody
Five-time Emmy nominee Van Hansis, ‘Eastsiders’ stars Kit Williamson & John Halbach
‘Drag Race’ season 9 star Peppermint
Q.Digital’s Jordan Star
Frankie Grande
Zeke Thomas
Brita Filter

Photos by: Justin Barbin.


Spread the love
  • 151
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
    151
    Shares
  •  
    151
    Shares
  • 151
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

On Stonewall Inn’s hallowed ground, you can still drink, dance & flirt

Spread the love
  • 151
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
    151
    Shares

This is the first in a series of “Then & Now” articles looking at historic places that have made New York the cradle of LGBTQ life from Stonewall to today at Pride 50.

Stonewall THEN 

In the late 1960s, The Stonewall Inn wasn’t the history-altering turn-up it is today.

It was a Mafia-owned private club that catered to Greenwich Village’s emerging community. Like all gay bars at the time, the place was subject to frequent police raids—just another fact of life at a time when homosexuality was outlawed and pretty much everyone was on what now call the DL. During one such raid on the night of June 28, 1969, a riot broke out after bar patrons began resisting arrest.

Urban legend has it that the queens at the bar that night were so distraught by the recent death of gay icon Judy Garland that they were in a particularly defiant mood. “Not today, Satan,” doesn’t even begin to describe their response to the boys in blue. As patrons were loaded into the paddy wagon, the crowd on the street turned on the police, forcing officers to barricade themselves inside the bar itself.

A year later, the heartiest among them marched from the Village to Central Park to commemorate the event, in what is recognized as the first gay pride march and a precursor to the riotous parades we see all over the country today. The Stonewall riots, as they are now known, are considered the spark that ignited the modern equality movement.

The bar’s history has been immortalized in more than one eponymous film. Skip Roland Emmerich’s whitewashed 2015 retelling and try to dig up a bootleg copy of English director Nigel Finch’s 1995 flick. Like Emmerich’s Stonewall, Finch’s is heavily fictionalized, but it honors the role that trans women of color like Sylvia Rivera and Marsha P. Johnson played in the uprising.

Stonewall NOW

Photo by Rhododendrites on Wikimedia Commons, CC 4.0 

Today, Stonewall Inn occupies half the space of the original—but it’s exponentially louder, prouder, and more historically significant. The space reopened in the 1990s and underwent several renovations and revamps before being declared a national monument by President Obama in 2016. The Stonewall National Monument includes not only the bar, but Christopher Street Park across the street, featuring haunting statues by sculptor George Segal commemorating the long struggle for equality.

It is the first LGBTQ site in the country to have been listed on the State and National Registers of Historic Places and to be named a U.S. National Park monument – and it’s probably a good guess that it’s the only one that features our own kind of natural beauty: drag shows, go-go dancers, and DJs.

As such, it has become something akin to hallowed ground for America’s gay community. In recent years, it has been the site of protests against the Trump administration, memorials for the victims of the 2016 Pulse Nightclub massacre, and celebrations marking the passage of marriage equality both in New York state and the nation as a whole.

But don’t let its revered status fool you. Stonewall is still a place to grab a drink – or several – shoot some pool, flirt with an increasingly diverse group of cute queers, and work up a sweat on the dance floor.

If you’re lucky, you may even run into a celeb or two. Cate Blanchette, Taylor Swift, Joe Biden, and Madonna are just four divas to have graced the bar’s cabaret stage for surprise appearances over the years.


Spread the love
  • 151
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
    151
    Shares
  •  
    151
    Shares
  • 151
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

Beluga Whales, Jerry Falwell Jr’s Pool Boy, Mayonnaise, Judge Judy, Meghan McCain, Big Gay Ice Cream, Flag Emojis: HOT LINKS

Spread the love
  • 151
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
    151
    Shares

LITTLE GREY AND LITTLE WHITE. Two beluga whales held in captivity in China transported to Iceland sanctuary: “Little Grey and Little White, two 12-year-old female belugas, left behind their previous lives entertaining visitors at the Changfeng Ocean World and were flown across the globe in specially tailored containers. The whales, which each weigh about 900kg and are four metres long, will continue their epic journey by truck and ferry to the sanctuary at Klettsvik Bay at Heimaey, one of the Westman Islands off the south coast of Iceland.”

BRAIN CHANGES. Scientists detect earliest signs of Parkinson’s: ‘The changes were seen about 15 to 20 years before these individuals would typically start to show physical symptoms. In addition, these genetically predisposed participants showed no sign of deterioration in their dopamine system. “That by itself is a major breakthrough on how you see Parkinson’s disease,” said Politis.’

JERRY FALWELL JR. The Miami Herald dives deeper into the pool boy saga.

WEIRD CRAZE OF THE DAY. Eating tubs of mayonnaise at sporting events.

MAYOR PETE. Some gay top Hollywood donors are waiting and seeing: ‘As historic as Buttigieg’s candidacy might be, a number of Hollywood’s most prolific LGBTQ donors aren’t ready to commit to him exclusively just yet. Many of Hollywood’s influential base of bundlers and donors are backing multiple candidates, spreading their money around,contributing to other politicians with whom they have longtime relationships and who have their own long track record on LGBTQ issues, like Kamala Harris and Joe Biden.’

PROFILE OF THE DAY. Judge Judy: “I don’t hate getting older,” she told me, as the elevator doors closed. “I just hate looking it.”

GLITTER AND BE GAY. School in uproar after administration removes Lady Gaga quote about being gay from outdoor sign. “It makes us all look bad as a whole, honestly, because not everyone has the same belief that we should hide these things. It’s hard to say you’re so diverse and that you’re welcoming everyone when something as small as a sign is enough to cause such backlash.”

THE B WORD. Meghan McCain called Joy Behar a “bitch” on air. “Oh don’t feel bad for me bitch, I’m paid to do this, OK.”

SAMANTHA BEE. The Full Frontal star tells longshot Dem candidates to run for the Senate. “Winning the presidency would be great, but real change is impossible unless the Senate changes hands too. Bullock is just one of many Democrats wasting his time in a presidential race who could be way more useful running for something else.”

WAITRESS. Todrick Hall is joining the cast of the Broadway show.

GQ. Why do gay men walk so fast?

BIG GAY ICE CREAM. How it has grown in 10 years. ‘Quint says Big Gay Ice Cream is not an LGBTQ brand so much as a brand that celebrates the humor, camp, and kitsch embraced by gay culture. The word “gay,” he points out, refers to orientation but also to joy. Most people would describe the bold-colored stripes swirling up the company’s cone logo as a rainbow. But technically speaking it’s not because the colors are–intentionally–in the wrong order.’

YOU NEED TO CALM DOWN. Did Taylor Swift rip off Beyoncé?

FLAGGOTS. Where are all the flag emojis?

THIRSTY THURSDAY. Jaycee Domincel

The post Beluga Whales, Jerry Falwell Jr’s Pool Boy, Mayonnaise, Judge Judy, Meghan McCain, Big Gay Ice Cream, Flag Emojis: HOT LINKS appeared first on Towleroad Gay News.


Spread the love
  • 151
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
    151
    Shares
  •  
    151
    Shares
  • 151
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

Why each AFC South team will go over and under their Vegas win total in 2019

Spread the love
  • 151
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
    151
    Shares

Vegas win totals are set for the 2019 season. With teams through their offseason workout program, it’s time to consider where each team will land.

The true NFL offseason is officially upon us. Mandatory minicamp has come to a close and players from all 32 teams have gone their separate ways. Most players will get some vacation time in while continuing to work out in preparation for the return to training camp in late July. Once training camp arrives, the road to Super Bowl 54 begins in earnest.

Each year, sports bettors are able to wager on where they think each team will finish up in the win column. Sportsbooks release a number for a team’s win total and you can bet over or under that number. If you land on the number, it’s a push, or tie.

Below are win totals for the four teams in the NFC West. The number in parenthesis is the juice on the over and the under. For example, if you bet the over on 10 wins for the Colts, the payout is +130 (you bet $100 to win $130). If you bet the under, the payout is -150 (you bet $150 to win $100). That means the under is the favorite.

Sportsbooks are not predicting each team will win the number of games on the win total. Rather, they are setting a number so that they can get a similar amount of money on both sides of the wager. They do not want an extensive liability on one side or the other since then they would be relying on a specific outcome. With even money on both sides of a wager, the house will profit more often than not.

Now that roster overhauls are mostly complete and teams have finished up spring workouts, we took a few minutes to chat with site managers from each SB Nation team blog. They offered reasons why their team could end up over the win total and why their team could end up under the win total. The sites pay close attention to their teams and have more insight than your average national reporter.

Indianapolis Colts: 10 (+130, -150) — Stampede Blue

Why over: The Colts ended the 2018 regular season as arguably the hottest team in football. The snap count for rookies and second-year players was astronomical and it took some time for a new coaching staff to start hitting its stride. This year, all but one starter has returned from both sides of the ball, the rookie and second-year players who took a step forward in the back half of the season will be entering their second seasons in the Colts new offensive and defensive schemes. No franchise used more draft picks on defense in 2019 than Chris Ballard did for the Colts. He also signed free agent wide receiver Devin Funchess and drafted speedy rookie Parris Campbell. Jack Doyle will return to the field after injuries derailed his 2018 campaign. The prospect of Ebron and Doyle taking the field for an entire season is rather exciting for the offense. The Colts have one of the best offensive lines in the NFL, return all of their starters, and project to be even better in pass protection and run blocking with the return of Howard Mudd to the staff. Andrew Luck is entering the off-season training program healthy for the first time in three years. Frankly, no team has more reason to believe that it should improve its record from a season ago than the Colts. They won ten games last year.

Why under: The Colts struggled considerably to compete against teams with good offenses in the early part of the 2018 season. This year, the offensive power they will face will be considerably stronger for much of the season. Winning difficult games against marquee NFL quarterbacks is always a challenge and these games can often go either way. If you consider that losing a game or two in the division is almost an annual certainty and throw in road games against the Los Angeles Chargers, Kansas City Chiefs, Pittsburgh Steelers, and New Orleans Saints, you’re dealing with a rather small margin for error. Philip Rivers, reigning NFL MVP Patrick Mahomes, Ben Roethlisberger, and Drew Brees will test the Colts young defense. Getting to ten wins in 2019 will be harder than it was a year ago.

Houston Texans: 8.5 (+130, -150) — Battle Red Blog

Why over: The Texans face some big questions after a tough offseason, but this is still a team that won 11 games last year. Even with some regression, there is a decent-sized cushion to stay above .500. They remain in a division with two teams (Titans, Jaguars) that have plenty of their own question marks heading into the season.

Most importantly? They are running DeShaun Watson back out there. They invested in their offensive line, which was badly needed after a 62-sack season last year for Watson. There are plenty of questions between veteran Matt Kalil and rookies Tytus Howard and Max Scharping, but they shot their shot with free agency dollars and a first and second round pick. If the line shows even a little bit of improvement, over 8.5 wins seems eminently reasonable.

Why under: DeShaun Watson was pummeled last season, to the tune of 62 sacks. He still put together eye-popping numbers, but he cannot continue at that rate. The Texans drafted offensive tackles Tytus Howard and Max Scharping in the first two rounds of the NFL Draft and signed Matt Kalil to play left tackle, but all three come with question marks. If the offensive line does not show significant improvement from last year, this offense could be in trouble.

On the defensive side of the ball, they lost safeties Tyrann Mathieu and Andre Hal, and cornerbacks Kareem Jackson and Kevin Johnson. They replaced them with Tashaun Gipson and Bradley Roby, but they are downgrades in the secondary. The Texans face a host of strong offenses in 2019, including the Patriots at home and the Saints and Chargers on the road.

Jacksonville Jaguars: 8 (+115, -135) — Big Cat Country

Why over: The 2018 season for the Jaguars was a staggering disappointment, but the team wasn’t bad at everything. It still had one of the NFL’s most elite defenses, finishing No. 4 in points allowed. What dragged the team down was an offense that was decimated by injuries — especially along the offensive line — coupled with poor play at quarterback. Nick Foles doesn’t need to play like a Super Bowl MVP to get Jacksonville back on track. As long as he’s efficient and avoids mistakes, the Jaguars can lean on their running game and defense to replicate their 2017 success.

Why under: The issues for the Jaguars that caused them to bottom out went way beyond quarterback. The defense wasn’t its self last year and will go into 2019 without Malik Jackson, Tashaun Gipson, and Barry Church — three players who played huge parts in the 2017 dominance. The Jaguars also traded away Dante Fowler, Jr. and will likely be without Telvin Smith. And aside from the poor play of Blake Bortles and Cody Kessler, the offense dealt with a horrible season from Leonard Fournette, a staggering lack of talent at receiver, and injuries along the offensive line. Signing Nick Foles — an inconsistent quarterback who is notorious for checking down short of first downs — isn’t going to come close to solving all those issues.

Tennessee Titans: 8 (+110, -130) — Music City Miracles

Why over: Injuries are one consistent aspect of the NFL, but predicting who will get hurt is not a simple task. Marcus Mariota has dealt with numerous injuries throughout his concern, which is concerning. However, the Titans upgraded at backup quarterback, swapping in Ryan Tannehill for Blaine Gabbert. The Titans went 9-7 in spite of Mariota dealing with an elbow issue much of last season. They have a better option in case Mariota deals with a significant injury, which offers some insurance on the over.

The team made significant upgrades on offense with guard Rodger Saffold and wide receiver Adam Humphries. Cameron Wake could add some punch to a pass rush that struggled with consistency.

They face a tough schedule with the NFC South and AFC West, but they get the Chargers, Chiefs, and Saints at home. If they can get through a tough first four games (at Cleveland, vs. Indianapolis, at Jacksonville, at Atlanta) with a pair of wins, they’ll be in great shape.

Why under: Guard Rodger Saffold upgrades the offensive line and guard Nate Davis offers upside, but question marks remain. If the line does not improve on a shaky 2018, Marcus Mariota’s health could be more likely to come into play. Tannehill is better than Gabbert, but he’s still not a great option.

Otherwise on offense, can Corey Davis take the next step in his development. The addition of free agent Adam Humphries could help, but it’s possible Humphries is nearing his ceiling and Davis proves more flash. If they both don’t take a step forward for Mariota, it could make for tough sledding for the offense.

The defense could be what carries this group, but they need to see more from the pass rush. They ranked 22nd in adjusted sack rate, and need Cameron Wake and Harold Landry to beef it up. If they don’t step up, this defense could be left spinning its wheels to a certain extent.


Spread the love
  • 151
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
    151
    Shares
  •  
    151
    Shares
  • 151
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

Homophobic rugby player asks fans for $3 million to cover his legal bills after being fired

Spread the love
  • 151
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
    151
    Shares

Israel Folau

Former professional rugby player Israel Folau is in a bit of a bind and he’s hoping fans will help bail him out… to the tune of $3 million.

In April, the now ex-New South Wales Waratahs player took to Instagram to lecture his 330K+ followers about the evils of homosexuality, warning them that “hell awaits … homosexuals,” and urging gay people to “repent” as “only Jesus saves lives.”

“Those that are living in sin will end up in Hell unless you repent,” he spouted. “Jesus Christ loves you and is giving you time to turn away from your sin and come to him.”

In response, Rugby Australia and New South Wales Rugby (the organizing bodies that employed Folau and oversee his team, the New South Wales Waratahs) announced they were terminating Folau’s four-year $5 million contract, saying the post was “inconsistent with the values of the sport” and that Folau breached his contract by sharing material on social media that “condemns, vilifies or discriminates against people on the basis of their sexuality.”

Naturally, Folau sued. But it turns out, suing is expensive. So now he’s launched a $3 million fundraiser to try and cover his mounting legal costs.

According to Folau, he’s already spent $100,000 of his own money, and he’s sick of it, so he wants other people to “fund the rest of my action in court.”

“I believe the termination of my contract is unlawful, which is why I have started legal proceedings against Rugby Australia and Rugby New South Wales,” he laments on his GoFundMe page.

Folau is suing his former employers for $10 million for loss of earnings as well as “associated exposure and opportunities.”

“The termination has cost Mr. Folau the best years of his rugby career, participation at the Rugby World Cup and the chance to become the greatest Wallaby try-scorer (a decades-old record he was likely to break),” his lawsuit reads.

On his GoFundMe page, Folau says he doesn’t think he did anything wrong when he told gay people they were “living in sin” and would “end up in hell.”

“I uploaded some messages from the Bible on my Instagram page,” he writes. “I believe that sharing the Bible is an act of love and compassion.”

So far, Folau has raised about $1,300 of his $3 million goal.

Related: The viral rugby kiss that’s tackling homophobia


Spread the love
  • 151
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
    151
    Shares
  •  
    151
    Shares
  • 151
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

VAR is making the World Cup a literal game of inches

Spread the love
  • 151
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
    151
    Shares

Sorry, goalkeepers.

It can feel a bit shabby, thinking about VAR when there’s so much more to be thinking about. Argentina, rallying from three goals to win only their second World Cup point ever. Scotland, putting together one of the great collapses. Group D swinging one way, then the other, as first—

Wait, what’s that? Oh, the referee’s got her hand to her ear. And yes, she’s going over to the television screen … and, yes. There it is. It’s time to think about VAR again.

On the off-chance you missed it, here’s what happened. Scotland, having romped out to a three-goal lead, folded in on themselves like wet origami. Argentina came back to 3-2, then Scotland conceded a penalty (confirmed by VAR, of course, but probably fair enough). And then Lee Alexander saved it! Pandemonium! Joy! Despair! Wait, what’s that? The referee’s got her hand, etc., and so on.

Turns out Alexander had moved an inch from her line. Booking. Retake. Goal. Argentina are still alive, just about, depending on results elsewhere; Scotland are out. It would take a heart of purest granite not to feel delighted at the continuation of Argentina’s grand adventure, coming as it does despite their own national football association. But also, more VAR.

Of the many odd and strange things about football’s chaotic charge into the world of video refereeing, this sense of interruption might be the most immediately annoying. Come on, referees. We’re trying to have a moment here. Moments are fun.

But beyond that, there is something particularly enervating about the enforcement of VAR in these particular circumstances. Goalkeepers advancing off their line was, in the great list of Problems With Football, somewhere below “All kits look the same these days” and “They don’t make corner flags the way they used to”.

And as problems go, it only exists in extremis. It might well matter if the goalkeeper is a couple of feet off their line at the moment a penalty kick it taken. But it doesn’t matter the slightest if they’ve stolen an inch. The important thing isn’t whether the goalkeeper is touching the line; it’s whether they are gaining an advantage by leaving the line. One is a question of absolutes, the other is not. And VAR cares, by design, about the wrong one.

There are some questions that are actually better answered by the human eye, as modified by the human brain, than by the strict liability of a yes/no question as revealed by replay. A referee can, when assessing encroachment, ask themselves important questions. Questions like “Was that a foot or an inch?” and “Did that look important or relevant?” and “What, really, am I trying to punish here?”. And then they can weigh their response accordingly.

Turn to the television, however, and we discover that that encroachment is a binary state of on or off, that an inch is the same as a foot, and that a keeper moving from their line should be assessed in the same fashion as a ball crossing the line. Which is all a bit weird.

Anyway, the argument rumbles on. The Premier League, which is introducing VAR next season, has announced that the system won’t be ruling on issues of goalkeeping encroachment. We can only assume that they looked into the future, and they saw the episodes of ArsenalTV, and they recoiled in terror.

But the World Cup is stuck with it. VAR gives us more penalties, and then VAR nails the keeper’s feet to the line and tells them not to even think about moving. It’s going to happen again, and if it doesn’t — if keepers are cowed into caution — then it will be happening anyway, just inside the heads of goalkeepers.

It’s a crude test, but: if the interested neutral comes out the other end of a crucial World Cup game that was 3-0 at 74 minutes and 3-3 by the final whistle, and that neutral is not exhilarated or giddy or running round their house with their trousers on their head, but instead annoyed and resentful and frankly just tired of the grinding march of weaponized pedantry, then congratulations! You’ve broken the World Cup, just a little bit. Nice one.


Spread the love
  • 151
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
    151
    Shares
  •  
    151
    Shares
  • 151
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

Cracker Barrel tells antigay pastor hate isn’t on the menu then shows him the door

Spread the love
  • 151
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
    151
    Shares

Grayson Fritts

Cracker Barrel has put the brakes on an antigay pastor holding a hate event at one of its locations later this month.

Grayson Fritts, a Baptist pastor who also works as a police detective, had planned to hold an event for his congregation at a Cracker Barrel in Cleveland, Tennessee on June 29.

The decision to allow Fritts to stage an event at the eatery invited criticism from the Tennessee Democratic Party, which noted that Fritts’ beliefs conflicted with the the popular restaurant chain’s public dedication to inclusivity.

Cracker Barrel announced via Twitter that it would not allow Fritts to hold the event, saying: “We take pride in serving as a home away from home for all guests and in showing our communities and our country that the hospitality we practice is open for everyone. We serve everyone who walks through our doors with genuine hospitality, not hate, and require all guests to do the same.”

The chain also cited its corporate zero-tolerance policy for discrimination as grounds for blocking the Fritts event.

Fritts attracted national attention a few weeks ago when he labeled queer people “worthy of death” in a sermon he posted online.

The move sparked an investigation by the Knox County Sheriff’s Office into Fritts’ record to determine if his anti-LGBTQ biases affected any of his cases.

The department also placed Fritts on sick leave until July 19, when he will leave the department for good.

Related: Cop caught on camera calling gay people “freaks” and “animals” who should be “put to death”


Spread the love
  • 151
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
    151
    Shares
  •  
    151
    Shares
  • 151
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

mikenov on Twitter: Out of the tiny grains of sand, the concrete is built, that sustains New York City; ain’t it so, Mr. Trump, The Great Twister-Kapitalister?! On the blood, sweat, misery, and the EXPLOITATION of IMMIGRANTS this great NYC is built, ain’t it, Mr. Trump? NYC is the New Abwehr City. pic.twitter.com/lDXXFeb2EY

Spread the love
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

Out of the tiny grains of sand, the concrete is built, that sustains New York City; ain’t it so, Mr. Trump, The Great Twister-Kapitalister?!

On the blood, sweat, misery, and the EXPLOITATION of IMMIGRANTS this great NYC is built, ain’t it, Mr. Trump?

NYC is the New Abwehr City. pic.twitter.com/lDXXFeb2EY



Posted by

mikenov
on Thursday, June 20th, 2019 5:38pm

mikenov on Twitter


Spread the love
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
    151
    Shares
  • 151
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

1:09 PM 6/20/2019 | Trump and Trumpism – Review Of News And Opinions

Spread the love
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  


Michael_Novakhov
shared this story
from Trump and Trumpism – Review Of News And Opinions.

1:09 PM 6/20/2019

http://michael_novakhov.newsblur.com/

All News Review In 25 Saved Stories

Saved Stories – 250 |  Saved Stories – 25 – Page

Saved Stories – None
U.S. Navy Boot Camp Graduation: June 21, 2019
CBSNewsOnline’s YouTube Videos: Trump says he’s “draining the swamp,” but is he?
“trump and russia” – Google News: House to hold second ‘lessons from the Mueller report’ hearing – live updates – The Guardian
Russia’s Putin Says He’s Ready to Hold Talks With Donald Trump | Voice of America – English
“Putin Trump” – Google News: Russia’s Putin Says He’s Ready to Hold Talks With Donald Trump – VOA News
CBSNewsOnline’s YouTube Videos: Retailers capitalize on Pride Month with rainbow merchandise
Trump’s bank under criminal investigation by feds for potential money laundering
Google Alert – Trump and Deutsche Bank: Trump’s bank under criminal investigation by feds for potential money laundering
Trump’s bank under criminal investigation by feds for potential money laundering
Michael Novakhov on Twitter from Michael_Novakhov (4 sites): mikenov on Twitter: 10:50 AM 6/20/2019 trumpandtrumpism.com/2019/06/20/105…
10:50 AM 6/20/2019 | Trump and Trumpism – Review Of News And Opinions
“trump criminal investigation” – Google News: Trump: ‘Iran made a very big mistake!’ – POLITICO.eu
“cambridge analytica” – Google News: Calls to break up ‘Big Tech’ are misguided – The Maine Wire
mikenov on Twitter: The Trump Investigations Blog by Michael Novakhov – Review Of News And Opinions: 10:54 AM 6/20/2019 – All News Review In 25 Saved … trumpinvestigations.blogspot.com/2019/06/1054-a…
The Trump Investigations Blog by Michael Novakhov – Review Of News And Opinions: 10:54 AM 6/20/2019 – All News Review In 25 Saved … trumpinvestigations.blogspot.com/2019/06/1054-a…
CBSNewsOnline’s YouTube Videos: Biden’s comments on segregationists spark criticism ahead of South Carolina event
10:54 AM 6/20/2019 – All News Review In 25 Saved Stories
“Putin Trump” – Google News: Putin says he’s open to talks with Trump, but warns against using force on Iran – PBS NewsHour
“Russian Intelligence services” – Google News: The improbable careers of Vladimir Putin’s bodyguards – The Economist
“trump as danger to National Security” – Google News: A fly-on-the-wall account of what China tells American bigwigs – The Economist
mikenov on Twitter: McCabe: Congress should perform an impeachment inquiry youtu.be/7TuDG_cOUUI via @YouTube
McCabe: Congress should perform an impeachment inquiry youtu.be/7TuDG_cOUUI via @YouTube
CBSNewsOnline’s YouTube Videos: Iran shoots down U.S. military drone over Strait of Hormuz
McCabe: Congress should perform an impeachment inquiry – YouTube
Live: House Judiciary holds hearing on ‘Lessons from the Mueller report’ | Part 2 – YouTube
Saved Stories – None
U.S. Navy Boot Camp Graduation: June 21, 2019
 

From: Trump
Duration: 00:00

Watch as the #USNavy’s newest Sailors graduate boot camp during Recruit Training Command’s Pass-In-Review. It is a formal military ceremony that honors a Sailor’s hard work and dedication to a new way of life. Pass-In-Review also ties together the future of the Navy with our long-held naval traditions and customs.

CBSNewsOnline’s YouTube Videos: Trump says he’s “draining the swamp,” but is he?
 

From: CBSNewsOnline
Duration: 06:37

President Trump promises he will “drain the swamp” if he’s reelected, but many of his appointees have lobbying or corporate ties. CBS News White House reporter Kathryn Watson joined CBSN to discuss the president’s promise.

Subscribe to the CBS News Channel HERE: http://youtube.com/cbsnews
Watch CBSN live HERE: http://cbsn.ws/1PlLpZ7
Follow CBS News on Instagram HERE: https://www.instagram.com/cbsnews/
Like CBS News on Facebook HERE: http://facebook.com/cbsnews
Follow CBS News on Twitter HERE: http://twitter.com/cbsnews

Get the latest news and best in original reporting from CBS News delivered to your inbox. Subscribe to newsletters HERE: http://cbsn.ws/1RqHw7T

Get your news on the go! Download CBS News mobile apps HERE: http://cbsn.ws/1Xb1WC8

Get new episodes of shows you love across devices the next day, stream CBSN and local news live, and watch full seasons of CBS fan favorites like Star Trek Discovery anytime, anywhere with CBS All Access. Try it free! http://bit.ly/1OQA29B


CBSN is the first digital streaming news network that will allow Internet-connected consumers to watch live, anchored news coverage on their connected TV and other devices. At launch, the network is available 24/7 and makes all of the resources of CBS News available directly on digital platforms with live, anchored coverage 15 hours each weekday. CBSN. Always On.

 CBSNewsOnline’s YouTube Videos

“trump and russia” – Google News: House to hold second ‘lessons from the Mueller report’ hearing – live updates – The Guardian

House to hold second ‘lessons from the Mueller report’ hearing – live updates  The GuardianRanking House Judiciary member Doug Collins blasted today’s Mueller report hearing in a statement accusing Democrats of “theater” and trying to “redo” the … “trump and russia” – Google News
Russia’s Putin Says He’s Ready to Hold Talks With Donald Trump | Voice of America – English

MOSCOW – Russian President Vladimir Putin said on Thursday he was ready to hold talks with U.S. President Donald Trump if that was what his U.S. …
“Putin Trump” – Google News: Russia’s Putin Says He’s Ready to Hold Talks With Donald Trump – VOA News

Russia’s Putin Says He’s Ready to Hold Talks With Donald Trump  VOA NewsRussian President Vladimir Putin said on Thursday he was ready to hold talks with U.S. President Donald Trump if that was what his U.S. counterpart wanted, … “Putin Trump” – Google News
CBSNewsOnline’s YouTube Videos: Retailers capitalize on Pride Month with rainbow merchandise
 

From: CBSNewsOnline
Duration: 01:15

The value of the LGBTQ market is not lost on businesses trying to win over consumers during Pride Month.

 CBSNewsOnline’s YouTube Videos

Trump’s bank under criminal investigation by feds for potential money laundering

Deutsche Bank — the bank that loaned money to Trump when no one else would — is in trouble. The bank, which Trump was once into for $2 billion, …
Google Alert – Trump and Deutsche Bank: Trump’s bank under criminal investigation by feds for potential money laundering

Deutsche Bank — the bank that loaned money to Trump when no one else would — is in trouble. The bank, which Trump was once into for $2 billion, … Google Alert – Trump and Deutsche Bank
Trump’s bank under criminal investigation by feds for potential money laundering

Deutsche Bank — the bank that loaned money to Trump when no one else would — is in trouble. The bank, which Trump was once into for $2 billion, …
Michael Novakhov on Twitter from Michael_Novakhov (4 sites): mikenov on Twitter: 10:50 AM 6/20/2019 trumpandtrumpism.com/2019/06/20/105…
 


Posted by mikenov on Thursday, June 20th, 2019 2:51pm

 mikenov on Twitter

 Michael Novakhov on Twitter from Michael_Novakhov (4 sites)

10:50 AM 6/20/2019 | Trump and Trumpism – Review Of News And Opinions
 

Michael_Novakhov shared this story from Trump and Trumpism – Review Of News And Opinions.

10:50 AM 6/20/2019

http://michael_novakhov.newsblur.com/

All News Review In 25 Saved Stories

Saved Stories – 250 |  Saved Stories – 25 – Page

Saved Stories – None
Russia-U.S.-Israel Meeting in Jerusalem Next Monday Is Doomed to Fail. Here Is Why
Trump Is a Threat to Democracy, House Intel Chairman Schiff Says
After suspected neo-Nazi murder, pro-migrant mayors in Germany get death threats
Deutsche Bank under investigation for compliance with money laundering laws: Report
Lawrence’s Last Word: America’s History Of Concentration Camps | The Last Word | MSNBC – YouTube
Adam Schiff Lays Out House Intelligence Committee Plans in Speech | NowThis – YouTube
deutsche bank – Google Search
“The President has a really good story to tell. We have unemployment lower than we’ve seen in decades. We have people who stopped looking for work coming back into the labor force. We are in a record growth period.” Michael Steel @MSNBC (do you believe?)
Iran made a very big mistake!
Livestream: House Judiciary Committee Hearing Regarding the Mueller Report – Lawfare
ABC News’s YouTube Videos: Syrian refugee charged with targeting US church
House to hold second ‘lessons from the Mueller report’ hearing – live updates – The Guardian
PBSNewsHour’s YouTube Videos: WATCH LIVE: House hearing to discuss military deployment to the US-Mexico border
9:43 AM 6/20/2019 – All News Review In 25 Saved Stories trumpandtrumpism.com/2019/06/20/943…
9:43 AM 6/20/2019 – All News Review In 25 Saved Stories | Trump and Trumpism – Review Of News And Opinions
9:46 AM 6/20/2019 trumpandtrumpism.com/2019/06/20/946…
9:46 AM 6/20/2019 | Trump and Trumpism – Review Of News And Opinions
House to hold second ‘lessons from the Mueller report’ hearing – live updates
S&P opens at Record High!
Lessons from the Mueller report on Russian political warfare – Brookings Institution
Deutsche Bank, Khashoggi, Europe’s Fossil Fuels: Your Thursday Briefing
Deutsche Bank faces FBI investigation for possible money-laundering lapses: source
Deutsche Bank Is Investigated by US Over Money Laundering: NYT
Deutsche Bank Slumps Following NYT Report of US Money Laundering Probe
FBI Reportedly Looking Into Deutsche Bank After Money-Laundering Report That Included Jared …
Saved Stories – None
Russia-U.S.-Israel Meeting in Jerusalem Next Monday Is Doomed to Fail. Here Is Why
Michael_Novakhov shared this story .

Next Monday, security chiefs from the U.S., Russia and Israel will meet in Jerusalem to discuss “regional security issues”. This bizarre arrangement, excitedly billed in Israel as a “security summit”, butdownplayed by Moscow as “expert consultations”, will bring together for two days Russia’s Secretary of the Security Council Nikolai Patrushev, U.S. National Security Advisor John Bolton and Israeli Chairman of the Security Council Meir Ben-Shabbat.

It was an Israeli initiative to discuss the situation in Syria and Iran’s “malign role” in the region. The Israelis handled almost all the preparatory work, dispatching teams to Washington and Moscow withlittle direct interaction between Russia and the U.S.

AD

For Moscow, it is really awkward to discuss issues surrounding Iran, Russia’s regional partner and, since 2015, a military ally in Syria, with Iran’s sworn enemies — Israel and the United States, — in Jerusalem and in the midst of a major spike in US-Iran tensions that might well end up in a military collision. Russia knows that the Israelis and the Americans will try to drive a hard anti-Iran agenda that Russia does not share.

The trilateral format is also a downgrade for Russia’s exclusive peer-to-peer dialogue with the U.S.

There is ample speculation about some “Grand Bargain” in which Russia would agree to drive Iran out of Syria in exchange for U.S. and Israeli recognition of the Syrian regime and U.S. lifting sanctions on Syria, opening the doors for the post-war international reconstruction funding. This is not in the cards.

Washington is building up expectations for some “new Russian proposals” to reduce Iran’s role in Syria, but is likely to be disappointed. Moscow will not go beyond the promises made to Trump in Helsinki last year to keep Iranian proxi forces at least 80 kilometers from the Israeli border. Foreign Minister Lavrov’s statement a year ago that any expectations that Russia could get the Iranians out of Syria are “unrealistic” still stands today.

Even more so, the latest regime offensive in Idlib, in which Iranian controlled ground units are not taking part, have made the point clear to Moscow — without Iran, the Syrian regime cannot hold the ground and suppress the Sunni insurgency.

While Russia is competing with Iran for influence and spoils in Syria and is unhappy with some Iranian moves (like securing a naval presence not far from the Russian base in Tartus), Moscow cannot afford a direct collision with Iran in Syria where the Iranians could make Russia’s life miserable and costs soaring.

The Israeli-Palestinian conflict and the new U.S. peace plan are not likely to loom large in the trilateral talks. Israel is not interested, while Bolton is happy to delegate this thankless portfolio to Jared Kushner.

Moscow reluctantly went along with the Jerusalem meeting largely to secure significant facetime with Bolton just days before the widely announced on Twitter, but yet to be confirmed, Trump-Putin meeting on the sidelines of the G20 summit in Osaka, Japan. It would be the last chance to put some meat on the bones of what at this point promises to be another photo-op with no substantive agreements.

A week from Osaka, there is no understanding whether Putin and Trump would sit down for a full bilateral, as was planned for the last G20 in Buenos Aires, or would have a brief stand-in or walk-along interaction as it happened at the APEC summit in Hanoi in 2017 or the G20 in Argentina last year.

Almost no preparation to speak of has occurred since Secretary Pompeo’s visit to Sochi in early May. No additional channels of communications, despite a seeming agreement with Pompeo, have been opened.

A “strategic security” meeting in Prague last week between Russia’s Deputy Foreign Minister Sergei Ryabkov and Undersecretary of State Andrea Thompson ended without any agreement or a commitment for a sustained dialogue on arms control.

Both Russia and the U.S. are signaling that they might not be interested in extending the New START Treaty, while neither side is making any moves to save the INF Treaty which will terminate on August 2.

It is not clear what Bolton and Patrushev could accomplish in such constrained timeframes. When Pompeo came to see Putin last month, the U.S. indicated interest in Russian assistance in bringing Iran and North Korea to the negotiating table with the Trump administration, as well as engineering a political settlement in Venezuela.

This indicates the diplomatic priorities for Trump’s presidency and his prospects in 2020.

Moscow would not mind helping Trump out, but it cannot serve as a provider of free geopolitical services to Washington. As Putin made it clear to Pompeo, there is a price — a full reversal of U.S. confrontational policies against Russia, including the lifting of all sanctions.

After all, it would be illogical to treat Russia as an enemy and then ask it for favors. Pompeo was noncommittal. Bolton is unlikely to be more forthcoming.

And even if Russia agreed to help, it cannot make progress with either Iran or North Korea without substantive changes in the all-demanding and unyielding U.S. position. Moscow cannot go to Pyongyang with Bolton’s “Libya model” for denuclearisation or to Teheran with Pompeo’s twelve “regime change” conditions. It cannot even convince Maduro that his future lies in Bolton’s tweet about a happy life on a sunny beach in Cuba.

No breakthrough in U.S.-Russia relations is in the cards before the end of Trump’s first term. The announced departure at the end of August of Fiona Hill, the NSC’s Senior Director for Europe, Russia and Eurasia, and the all but confirmed departure from Moscow of U.S. Ambassador John Huntsman at the end of the year are clear signs of diminished expectations and a realistic view that the U.S. presidential campaign will not be a great time to push an ambitious agenda in U.S.-Russia relations.

Muddling through without a new crisis would be an accomplishment.

The views expressed in opinion pieces do not necessarily reflect the position of The Moscow Times.

Trump Is a Threat to Democracy, House Intel Chairman Schiff Says
Michael_Novakhov shared this story .
“trump criminal investigation” – Google News: Trump: ‘Iran made a very big mistake!’ – POLITICO.eu

Trump: ‘Iran made a very big mistake!’  POLITICO.euThe Islamic Republic had claimed responsibility for shooting down an American drone. “trump criminal investigation” – Google News
“cambridge analytica” – Google News: Calls to break up ‘Big Tech’ are misguided – The Maine Wire

Calls to break up ‘Big Tech’ are misguided  The Maine WireIn recent weeks, Americans have heard much about the problems with “Big Tech.” National politicians from President Donald Trump to many Democrats running …

 “cambridge analytica” – Google News

mikenov on Twitter: The Trump Investigations Blog by Michael Novakhov – Review Of News And Opinions: 10:54 AM 6/20/2019 – All News Review In 25 Saved … trumpinvestigations.blogspot.com/2019/06/1054-a…
 

The Trump Investigations Blog by Michael Novakhov – Review Of News And Opinions: 10:54 AM 6/20/2019 – All News Review In 25 Saved … trumpinvestigations.blogspot.com/2019/06/1054-a…


Posted by mikenov on Thursday, June 20th, 2019 2:56pm

 mikenov on Twitter

The Trump Investigations Blog by Michael Novakhov – Review Of News And Opinions: 10:54 AM 6/20/2019 – All News Review In 25 Saved … trumpinvestigations.blogspot.com/2019/06/1054-a…
 

The Trump Investigations Blog by Michael Novakhov – Review Of News And Opinions: 10:54 AM 6/20/2019 – All News Review In 25 Saved … trumpinvestigations.blogspot.com/2019/06/1054-a…


Posted by mikenov on Thursday, June 20th, 2019 2:56pm
CBSNewsOnline’s YouTube Videos: Biden’s comments on segregationists spark criticism ahead of South Carolina event
 

From: CBSNewsOnline
Duration: 06:21

Ahead of Congressman Jim Clyburn’s “World Famous Fish Fry” in South Carolina, former Vice President Joe Biden’s comments on his past working relationship with segregationist senators is dominating the conversation among 2020 candidates. CBSN political reporter Caitlin Huey-Burns joined CBSN with the latest.

 CBSNewsOnline’s YouTube Videos

10:54 AM 6/20/2019 – All News Review In 25 Saved Stories
 

Michael_Novakhov shared this story from The Trump Investigations Blog by Michael Novakhov – Review Of News And Opinions.


Spread the love
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
    151
    Shares
  • 151
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

Poppers Found Not to Be Addictive in Study of Gay and Bisexual Men

Spread the love
  • 151
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
    151
    Shares

A study of 800 gay and bisexual men aged 18-35 men who use poppers (aka Alkyl or Amyl Nitrates) “found little evidence of typical dependency characteristics, including health, social, legal and financial problems, and no correlation between popper use and mental health or psychological stress,” researchers at the University of Technology in Sydney, Australia reported.

The study’s results came in the wake of a decision by the Australian government not to outlaw alkyl nitrates but to classify them as a Schedule 3 drug available over the counter in pharmacies.

Medicalxpress.com added: ‘Currently, poppers are available on prescription from pharmacies, but they are more commonly bought illicitly, in sex-on-premises venues and LGBT bars. A vial containing 25-30mL of the clear, strong-smelling fluid, possibly labelled as “VHS tape cleaner”, “leather cleaner” or “room deodoriser”, sells for up to $50, despite costing a couple of cents to manufacture.’

Said lead researcher Dr. Daniel Demant of the study and the government classification: “What we see with this research is that poppers are a very commonly used drug in the LGBT community, both recently and over their lifetime. Most of the users are already oppressed or marginalised based on their social identity as gay or bisexual men. This creates a question as to whether there would have been a discriminatory element in banning a substance with such a low risk profile. Banning a substance that is used by so many people would create a new class of criminals, basically overnight.”

That’s not to say poppers are without their health risks. Vice spoke with Dr Aifric Boylan, Australian GP and CEO of online doctor service Qoctor. Poppers create “a sense of euphoria, increased sex drive, reduced inhibitions, increased skin sensitivity, as well as relaxation of the walls of the anus,” according to Boylan.

Added Boylan: “It is possible to develop an allergic reaction over time. Another rare but serious complication is methaemoglobinaemia, which means the blood becomes unable to carry oxygen. This can be life threatening, and it happens when a person swallows rather than inhales poppers.”

Boylan continued: “If a person is susceptible to glaucoma—a condition involving raised pressure in the eyes—amyl can make it worse. And if a person has heart or circulation problems, the unpredictable changes in blood pressure can cause them to become seriously unwell. And if a person is on treatment for erectile dysfunction, such as Viagra, poppers can also cause seriously low blood pressure which may lead to stroke.”

The post Poppers Found Not to Be Addictive in Study of Gay and Bisexual Men appeared first on Towleroad Gay News.


Spread the love
  • 151
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
    151
    Shares
  •  
    151
    Shares
  • 151
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •